National Forum

Gaelic Football Ban In Dundalk School

(Oldest Posts First) - Go To The Latest Post


An interesting situation is emerging in Dundalk Grammar school where the school authorities are not allowing the school to participate in Gaelic Football competitions. They have used the excuse of wanting to focus on the school's 'pillar' sports of soccer, rugby & hockey despite the fact that, in the case of the boys at least, the competition that they wish to enter will not impact on any of the previously mentioned sports.

The students are planning a protest today and local paper The Argus have picked up the story:

https://www.independent.ie/regionals/louth/dundalk-news/students-at-fee-paying-louth-school-to-protest-over-ban-on-gaelic-football/a1087583790.html

The students have also set up a twitter page to raise awareness about their campaign: @dgsstudents4gaa

louthspeaker (Louth) - Posts: 45 - 20/05/2024 13:05:09    2545852

Link

Unbelievable that's happening, , sickens me,

Lockerroomboy (Wexford) - Posts: 454 - 22/05/2024 13:46:14    2546396

Link

It's funny if this was a school banning soccer over GAA we'd never hear the end of it.

oneoff (UK) - Posts: 1454 - 22/05/2024 13:52:16    2546399

Link

I am guessing it was never played there, not a case if they used to and stopped it?
But it makes sense considering the background of the school... fairly sure Sligo grammar are the same, they only practice the "garrison" sports and will not change their ways.

gaelsboy (Leitrim) - Posts: 505 - 22/05/2024 14:02:03    2546401

Link

Replying To louthspeaker:  "An interesting situation is emerging in Dundalk Grammar school where the school authorities are not allowing the school to participate in Gaelic Football competitions. They have used the excuse of wanting to focus on the school's 'pillar' sports of soccer, rugby & hockey despite the fact that, in the case of the boys at least, the competition that they wish to enter will not impact on any of the previously mentioned sports.

The students are planning a protest today and local paper The Argus have picked up the story:

https://www.independent.ie/regionals/louth/dundalk-news/students-at-fee-paying-louth-school-to-protest-over-ban-on-gaelic-football/a1087583790.html

The students have also set up a twitter page to raise awareness about their campaign: @dgsstudents4gaa"
Is there not some sort of parents committee in the school that can do something about this?

Bon (Kildare) - Posts: 2005 - 22/05/2024 14:03:02    2546402

Link

Replying To oneoff:  "It's funny if this was a school banning soccer over GAA we'd never hear the end of it."
Yeah I've never understood that double standard, and it's even prevalent among gaa people.
Anti soccer gaa people are dismissed as old sporting bigots still living in the past, while anti gaa people (loads of them eejits around) are pretty much given a pass.
At least that's the way it seems to me.

Galway9801 (Galway) - Posts: 1873 - 22/05/2024 14:42:00    2546418

Link

Replying To oneoff:  "It's funny if this was a school banning soccer over GAA we'd never hear the end of it."
I think this whole thing is being completely overplayed.

For starters, what you say here is not the case. The school that I went to myself, more than 30 years ago, still doesn't field soccer teams. Every so often, there's an appeal from a group of students that they should do so, but there's no big controversy over it.

Furthermore, this school in Louth hasn't "banned" gaelic football, as in they're not telling students that they can't play it under any circumstances. They're just choosing to continue what's always been their practice of not fielding teams in it.

Any school is perfectly entitled to make its own decisions about whatever sports or other extra-curricular activities it offers.

Pikeman96 (Wexford) - Posts: 2327 - 22/05/2024 17:00:51    2546456

Link

Plenty of GAA clubs knocking around that don't allow their members play soccer.

sponger (Wicklow) - Posts: 2911 - 22/05/2024 18:00:42    2546467

Link

Replying To oneoff:  "It's funny if this was a school banning soccer over GAA we'd never hear the end of it."
Absolutely. Pure bigotry. No great surprise, considering the school involved. But there are lots of others like them.

LePetitComté (Louth) - Posts: 2 - 22/05/2024 20:23:01    2546485

Link

Replying To Lockerroomboy:  "Unbelievable that's happening, , sickens me,"
It's ridiculous, but there are other schools where soccer while not being banned are definitely discouraged. Neither situation is acceptable.

ORIELMAN85 (Monaghan) - Posts: 242 - 22/05/2024 21:23:43    2546495

Link

Replying To gaelsboy:  "I am guessing it was never played there, not a case if they used to and stopped it?
But it makes sense considering the background of the school... fairly sure Sligo grammar are the same, they only practice the "garrison" sports and will not change their ways."
Maybe go into these places with your eyes wide open. "Fairly sure" there's a few lads in Ballinamore community school that want to start a cricket team in the school. Do you expect the school to set one up for them? Or do you look at the school and see that's its primary sports are Gaelic football and basketball?
If you were in Kilkenny would you go to Kilkenny College or St Kierans to progress at hurling?
Even more confusing, "considering the background of the school", would you go to Clongowes or Blackrock if you dreamt of one day winning a Hogan Cup? "Considering its background" how do we explain the policy of the Catholic university school and the sports it plays. No mention of GAA!!! Although I'm not sure you'd categorise martial arts as a "garrison sport"

ThePowerhouse (Leitrim) - Posts: 123 - 23/05/2024 09:42:16    2546514

Link

Replying To ThePowerhouse:  "Maybe go into these places with your eyes wide open. "Fairly sure" there's a few lads in Ballinamore community school that want to start a cricket team in the school. Do you expect the school to set one up for them? Or do you look at the school and see that's its primary sports are Gaelic football and basketball?
If you were in Kilkenny would you go to Kilkenny College or St Kierans to progress at hurling?
Even more confusing, "considering the background of the school", would you go to Clongowes or Blackrock if you dreamt of one day winning a Hogan Cup? "Considering its background" how do we explain the policy of the Catholic university school and the sports it plays. No mention of GAA!!! Although I'm not sure you'd categorise martial arts as a "garrison sport""
Kilkenny is a good example. If you wanted to play schools hurling, you'd go to St. Kieran's College or the CBS. If you wanted to play schools rugby, you'd be looking at Kilkenny College instead.

Wouldn't be reasonable to expect St. Kieran's College to set up a rugby team for you and your mates, or to demand that Kilkenny College should suddenly start fielding hurling teams.

Pikeman96 (Wexford) - Posts: 2327 - 23/05/2024 10:11:40    2546521

Link

The point is our schools should be promoting our national games, simple.

Lockerroomboy (Wexford) - Posts: 454 - 23/05/2024 10:57:10    2546537

Link

Replying To Pikeman96:  "I think this whole thing is being completely overplayed.

For starters, what you say here is not the case. The school that I went to myself, more than 30 years ago, still doesn't field soccer teams. Every so often, there's an appeal from a group of students that they should do so, but there's no big controversy over it.

Furthermore, this school in Louth hasn't "banned" gaelic football, as in they're not telling students that they can't play it under any circumstances. They're just choosing to continue what's always been their practice of not fielding teams in it.

Any school is perfectly entitled to make its own decisions about whatever sports or other extra-curricular activities it offers."
You are not correct in what you are saying about the schooling not banning Gaelic Football. One of the questions that the students asked school management to explain was why other newly introduced or re-introduced sports to the school (basketball & cricket) did not have to go before the board of management to make their case? Gaelic Football did and was refused permission with the reason given that they wanted to focus on their "pillar sports" despite the fact that the Gaelic Football competition they wished to enter did not take place at the same time as any of these sports.

louthspeaker (Louth) - Posts: 45 - 23/05/2024 11:00:46    2546540

Link

Replying To Pikeman96:  "Kilkenny is a good example. If you wanted to play schools hurling, you'd go to St. Kieran's College or the CBS. If you wanted to play schools rugby, you'd be looking at Kilkenny College instead.

Wouldn't be reasonable to expect St. Kieran's College to set up a rugby team for you and your mates, or to demand that Kilkenny College should suddenly start fielding hurling teams."
The vast majority of students and their parents do not choose the school that they go to on the basis of their preferred sport. The students of Dundalk Grammar School witnessed new sports being introduced or re-introduced to their school and went through an extensive process of seeking to be able to participate in Gaelic Football in their school.

- They surveyed teachers, who were supportive, with some also willing to coach teams
- They sought and received the endorsement of the parents' association
- They petitioned and received the backing of their fellow students
- They sought to participate in 1 competition that is held at a time that would not impact on other sports in the school

But when they went before their board of management (something other new sports did not have to do) and were refused, they viewed this decision as being hypocritical and as a result they rightly staged a protest.

From the school's website:

"Opportunities for involvement in extra-curricular actvities are extensive. School sports include rugby, hockey, soccer, athletics, tennis, basketball, badminton, cricket and volleyball as well sailing, horseriding, aqua-aerobics and gym fitness."

The school can accommodate all these sports and activities but not their own native games? Don't tell me this is not a ban on Gaelic Football.

louthspeaker (Louth) - Posts: 45 - 23/05/2024 11:43:04    2546553

Link

Replying To louthspeaker:  "The vast majority of students and their parents do not choose the school that they go to on the basis of their preferred sport. The students of Dundalk Grammar School witnessed new sports being introduced or re-introduced to their school and went through an extensive process of seeking to be able to participate in Gaelic Football in their school.

- They surveyed teachers, who were supportive, with some also willing to coach teams
- They sought and received the endorsement of the parents' association
- They petitioned and received the backing of their fellow students
- They sought to participate in 1 competition that is held at a time that would not impact on other sports in the school

But when they went before their board of management (something other new sports did not have to do) and were refused, they viewed this decision as being hypocritical and as a result they rightly staged a protest.

From the school's website:

"Opportunities for involvement in extra-curricular actvities are extensive. School sports include rugby, hockey, soccer, athletics, tennis, basketball, badminton, cricket and volleyball as well sailing, horseriding, aqua-aerobics and gym fitness."

The school can accommodate all these sports and activities but not their own native games? Don't tell me this is not a ban on Gaelic Football."
Fair play to the students for staging a protest against what is essentially a ban on Gaelic football by Dundalk Grammar School.

lilywhite1 (Kildare) - Posts: 3003 - 23/05/2024 12:00:30    2546559

Link

Replying To ThePowerhouse:  "Maybe go into these places with your eyes wide open. "Fairly sure" there's a few lads in Ballinamore community school that want to start a cricket team in the school. Do you expect the school to set one up for them? Or do you look at the school and see that's its primary sports are Gaelic football and basketball?
If you were in Kilkenny would you go to Kilkenny College or St Kierans to progress at hurling?
Even more confusing, "considering the background of the school", would you go to Clongowes or Blackrock if you dreamt of one day winning a Hogan Cup? "Considering its background" how do we explain the policy of the Catholic university school and the sports it plays. No mention of GAA!!! Although I'm not sure you'd categorise martial arts as a "garrison sport""
I remember our own year in school tried to set up a rugby team in 5th year and kicked up a big fuss with petitions meetings with teachers and principal to get it set up. In reality there was only two lads who actively played rugby and every other lad in the year signed up just to get out of school for games and training. Our petition was rightly rejected.

Leitrimforliam (Leitrim) - Posts: 262 - 23/05/2024 12:13:50    2546564

Link

Replying To louthspeaker:  "You are not correct in what you are saying about the schooling not banning Gaelic Football. One of the questions that the students asked school management to explain was why other newly introduced or re-introduced sports to the school (basketball & cricket) did not have to go before the board of management to make their case? Gaelic Football did and was refused permission with the reason given that they wanted to focus on their "pillar sports" despite the fact that the Gaelic Football competition they wished to enter did not take place at the same time as any of these sports."
If all of that is true, it reflects very poorly on the school. The fact that they have allowed other sports to be introduced in the meantime, but won't allow Gaelic Football is a very strange position.
Their rationale of focusing only on their 'pillar sports' doesn't wash, if they have recently allowed new sports in the school. Based on the list of sports you listed, it seems they have a lot pillars and some of them very recently introduced.

WanPintWin (Galway) - Posts: 2102 - 23/05/2024 12:25:02    2546567

Link

Replying To Leitrimforliam:  "I remember our own year in school tried to set up a rugby team in 5th year and kicked up a big fuss with petitions meetings with teachers and principal to get it set up. In reality there was only two lads who actively played rugby and every other lad in the year signed up just to get out of school for games and training. Our petition was rightly rejected."
I'd be pretty sure there are far more than two students at this school who play Gaelic football. I'd hazard a guess there are far more who play Gaelic football outside of the school than actively play volleyball, badminton, tennis or do horseriding.

WanPintWin (Galway) - Posts: 2102 - 23/05/2024 12:35:35    2546571

Link

Replying To louthspeaker:  "You are not correct in what you are saying about the schooling not banning Gaelic Football. One of the questions that the students asked school management to explain was why other newly introduced or re-introduced sports to the school (basketball & cricket) did not have to go before the board of management to make their case? Gaelic Football did and was refused permission with the reason given that they wanted to focus on their "pillar sports" despite the fact that the Gaelic Football competition they wished to enter did not take place at the same time as any of these sports."
I'm focussing only on the word "banned" here, not the rights or wrongs of whether or not they should establish a gaelic football team for schools competitions.

Being banned would mean students being told they're not allowed to play gaelic football at the school under any circumstances - i.e. if a group of lads went to the one of the playing fields during lunchtime and started a kickaround, they'd be rapidly told to stop.

That would be a ban if they'd instead be allowed to have an impromptu game of soccer or rugby or cricket or something else instead. However, if they're not allowed play any of those games by themselves and without proper supervision, then it would be a ban on all sports in such circumstances, and not just on gaelic football.

Again, "banned" is different from choosing not to field a team, particularly when they've never done so before. Would be different if they'd always fielded football teams but suddenly decided to stop while still fielding in other sports, but that doesn't appear to be the case here.

As a side note - for a variety of circumstances, two years ago my own club decided not to field a football team at minor level that year, and the lads played all hurling instead. But we didn't ban the minors from playing football. Two different things.

Pikeman96 (Wexford) - Posts: 2327 - 23/05/2024 13:11:08    2546582

Link