National Forum

Heavier Gaa Jerseys In Winter

(Oldest Posts First)

Teams wear the same jerseys all year round. Obviously some players wear skins or Under Armour , but should there not be long sleeved Jerseys in Winter?
It looks strange in the baltic conditions everyone wearing short sleeve

FoolsGold (Cavan) - Posts: 2522 - 21/02/2022 21:15:11    2401741

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Replying To FoolsGold:  "Teams wear the same jerseys all year round. Obviously some players wear skins or Under Armour , but should there not be long sleeved Jerseys in Winter?
It looks strange in the baltic conditions everyone wearing short sleeve"
Playing in long sleeves you would be colder and wetter. Try playing darts or snooker with an overcoat on.

Saynothing (Tyrone) - Posts: 1272 - 22/02/2022 09:39:42    2401772

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Ah lads, the threads on here is gone to the dogs!

tiobraid (Tipperary) - Posts: 3588 - 22/02/2022 10:14:20    2401783

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Not necessarily. They surely can design jersey's better now then 20 years ago

FoolsGold (Cavan) - Posts: 2522 - 22/02/2022 10:23:31    2401789

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I cycle, but only relatively recently bought some proper modern cycling trousers (BMX full length, not lycra) and a lightweight waterproof zip-up jacket. I can't believe how good they are. Even when you get wet, they dry out very quickly. Just keep cycling to keep your heart rate up, and you'll be fine. Stopping for shelter is generally a bad idea, as you start to freeze.

But before I saw sense and bought modern cycling gear, I used to cycle in football shorts or loose-fitting old worn track suit trousers and a pair of old Dubarry casual everyday shoes (no clip-ons; and my laces got caught in the crank … scary). I had a selection of old cotton t-shirts (mainly 1980s bands and those freebie t-shirts you used to get at BHAA 5k and 10k road runs) for tops. I thought the entire ensemble was grand until one day my nephews started laughing when they saw me, saying that I (quote): "you look like a homeless person who's stolen somebody else's bicycle". The remark hit home, and I then started to look at maybe joining the 21st century, at least as far as cycling gear was concerned.

When it rained, my old "lightweight" cotton t-shirts became heavier than my current specialist cycling jacket, and they were 100% useless. They just acted like a sponge. Very soon, you had this cold, heavy and sodden yoke flapping about you. One day, caught in a thunderstorm, and absolutely miserable, 30 miles from home and no shelter anywhere, I just took the t shirt off - it was actually warmer and more comfortable to not wear it.

I remember some football jerseys in the 1970s too, probably made with the same type of materials as old rugby jerseys - thick and heavy. In heavy rain, it was like wearing a suit of armour.

So I'd reckon modern players are fine the way they are with the lightweight jerseys and maybe a technical base layer garment; and, as with the cycling, if you keep moving, you'll be fine. And let's face it, modern players run more in a warm-up than I'd have managed in an entire half lol

essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 1141 - 22/02/2022 10:38:53    2401796

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Replying To FoolsGold:  "Not necessarily. They surely can design jersey's better now then 20 years ago"
Maybe for intercounty, a bit more budget and more room to stick sponsors on the arms. But putting extra expenses on clubs and parents to have winter and summer jerseys. The skins are great, can be worn with short sleeve jerseys in the winter. Kids can use the skins for training, games and for non-sport extra layer of clothing. Long sleeve jersey is more expensive than short sleeved too.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 6772 - 22/02/2022 11:35:54    2401821

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Yeah was more for Inter County that I meant.

FoolsGold (Cavan) - Posts: 2522 - 22/02/2022 12:49:59    2401845

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Long sleeve GAA jerseys would be horrible, your far better off with a decent tight base layer on underneath. The long sleeves would get soaked and stick to you.
I'd like to see goalkeepers having to wear the proper county jersey too for matches. Not wearing a tracksuit top or training shirt. There's so many good quality warm baselayers available these days there's no excuse.

Bon (Kildare) - Posts: 1699 - 22/02/2022 13:34:47    2401864

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Replying To FoolsGold:  "Teams wear the same jerseys all year round. Obviously some players wear skins or Under Armour , but should there not be long sleeved Jerseys in Winter?
It looks strange in the baltic conditions everyone wearing short sleeve"
who thinks up this stuff

mickcunningham (Westmeath) - Posts: 1527 - 22/02/2022 14:53:52    2401898

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Replying To mickcunningham:  "who thinks up this stuff"
Watching the games at the weekend it sprung up.

But baselayers are probaly the way.

FoolsGold (Cavan) - Posts: 2522 - 22/02/2022 17:37:03    2401962

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Replying To essmac:  "I cycle, but only relatively recently bought some proper modern cycling trousers (BMX full length, not lycra) and a lightweight waterproof zip-up jacket. I can't believe how good they are. Even when you get wet, they dry out very quickly. Just keep cycling to keep your heart rate up, and you'll be fine. Stopping for shelter is generally a bad idea, as you start to freeze.

But before I saw sense and bought modern cycling gear, I used to cycle in football shorts or loose-fitting old worn track suit trousers and a pair of old Dubarry casual everyday shoes (no clip-ons; and my laces got caught in the crank … scary). I had a selection of old cotton t-shirts (mainly 1980s bands and those freebie t-shirts you used to get at BHAA 5k and 10k road runs) for tops. I thought the entire ensemble was grand until one day my nephews started laughing when they saw me, saying that I (quote): "you look like a homeless person who's stolen somebody else's bicycle". The remark hit home, and I then started to look at maybe joining the 21st century, at least as far as cycling gear was concerned.

When it rained, my old "lightweight" cotton t-shirts became heavier than my current specialist cycling jacket, and they were 100% useless. They just acted like a sponge. Very soon, you had this cold, heavy and sodden yoke flapping about you. One day, caught in a thunderstorm, and absolutely miserable, 30 miles from home and no shelter anywhere, I just took the t shirt off - it was actually warmer and more comfortable to not wear it.

I remember some football jerseys in the 1970s too, probably made with the same type of materials as old rugby jerseys - thick and heavy. In heavy rain, it was like wearing a suit of armour.

So I'd reckon modern players are fine the way they are with the lightweight jerseys and maybe a technical base layer garment; and, as with the cycling, if you keep moving, you'll be fine. And let's face it, modern players run more in a warm-up than I'd have managed in an entire half lol"
I just knew you'd be a lycra lout.

Tirchonaill1 (Donegal) - Posts: 2123 - 22/02/2022 18:52:34    2401974

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There was a chap who hurled junior here in Dublin about 15 years ago who wore full body armour. He looked something like a cross between robocop and Michellin Man.

Needlesstosay, open season was declared on the basis that a few skelps would not take a bit out of him.

BarneyGrant (Dublin) - Posts: 659 - 22/02/2022 19:52:19    2401980

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I think we had long sleeve jerseys reintroduced in the early 2010's (I remember Galway in the early rounds of the league), it came and went as fast though.

ahsure. (Galway) - Posts: 1432 - 22/02/2022 20:19:29    2401988

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