National Forum

Anti GAA Agenda

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Replying To Breezy:  "Can you explain what you believe left wing means? If you are talking about the so called "woke agenda" or whatever its called thats not left wing. God we re getting worse than the USA for making everything left/right.

Left wing is an economic philosophy which few in Ireland are, socially liberal is what you are thinking of"
Woke people are usually on the left.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 263 - 24/10/2020 11:02:33    2300696

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Yes there is bias against the GAA within journalism but it is not for idealistic reasons.

Journalists are going mad for click bait stories now more than ever. The GAA or any other game that is playing whilst covid 19 is at large, is a story that will sell. This is especially so if there are outbreaks and if other sporting bodies are unable to play while the GAA are.

For instance, the golfing community will feel very hard done by as they are not allowed to play for 6 weeks. Their game is perceived as being elitist and also has had negative press associated with it twice in relation to covid headlines. IF you audit their game, you will find that there is virtually zero chance of getting covid on the course.

Can we say the same about the GAA as a full contact sport and the spread of covid?

"Attacks" on the GAA by journalists are measured and calibrated commentaries. Same with rugby and soccer.
the GAA is a very easy target for journalism as the organisation enjoys money from the tax payer, sponsorship and finally from fund raising at local levels. It is impossible not to have an opinion about any organisation who enjoys all 3 levels of income mentioned above. (not to mention gate receipts).

Yes there are elements of envy here, I will not deny this.

Donegalman (None) - Posts: 3791 - 24/10/2020 11:05:52    2300697

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All this left/right sh*te really is absorbing a lot of people. Does every human act have to be a political gesture now?!

SaffronDon (Antrim) - Posts: 2177 - 24/10/2020 11:41:40    2300705

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Roysh, nothing sickens me more than seeing the likes of clubs like Coola growing in the Southside. These sons and daughters of peasants can be seen walking around in their hideous jerseys clutching horls and dirty O'Neills Gahballs. Whole herds of them flock on the Dort every time their team plays in that oversized flea pit Croke Pork.
Everybody in Ireland knows that it is the boggers who are spreading the virus. After rolling around in the muck in some godforsaken field in somewhere like Ahascragh they head to the shebeen. where they are told to put their mobiles in a basket and proceed to slurp volumes alcohol out of a tin cup. Ban all Gaa activities I say. I'm surprised that the boys over in Montrose are televising these 'games".

avonali (Dublin) - Posts: 1525 - 24/10/2020 11:46:35    2300709

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Replying To KillingFields:  "Its not anti GAA people. Its people with common sense. And left wing media?? Give me a break.
Like most of ireland the media is significantly right wing. only have to look at the power dave quinn and iona institute. breda o brien etc have for example."
Incredible how you are wrong in nearly every post. To you Irish media are right wing (they must be the most left wing and woke of any EU country), rugby in Ireland is the everymans game as opposed to hyped up and purely elitist....it's almost impressive.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 1045 - 24/10/2020 11:52:50    2300712

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Replying To borisdblade:  "Using the term "mickey mouse" wasnt to make little of just the format. Its the whole idea of running a competition at the back end of the year under miserable conditions during lockdown just for the sake of it , to tick a few boxes. It shows how much the organisation values its top flight players."
My point still stands, most sports have had to change the format of their competitions and just because GAA is amateur does that mean it can't play it's games. NPHET has no problem with the games going ahead why so should people who dont know what their talking about just accept that. The GAA has coaches in every county and administrators to pay.

updwell (Limerick) - Posts: 483 - 24/10/2020 12:22:30    2300717

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Replying To Donegalman:  "Yes there is bias against the GAA within journalism but it is not for idealistic reasons.

Journalists are going mad for click bait stories now more than ever. The GAA or any other game that is playing whilst covid 19 is at large, is a story that will sell. This is especially so if there are outbreaks and if other sporting bodies are unable to play while the GAA are.

For instance, the golfing community will feel very hard done by as they are not allowed to play for 6 weeks. Their game is perceived as being elitist and also has had negative press associated with it twice in relation to covid headlines. IF you audit their game, you will find that there is virtually zero chance of getting covid on the course.

Can we say the same about the GAA as a full contact sport and the spread of covid?

"Attacks" on the GAA by journalists are measured and calibrated commentaries. Same with rugby and soccer.
the GAA is a very easy target for journalism as the organisation enjoys money from the tax payer, sponsorship and finally from fund raising at local levels. It is impossible not to have an opinion about any organisation who enjoys all 3 levels of income mentioned above. (not to mention gate receipts).

Yes there are elements of envy here, I will not deny this."
Spot on. It's debatable at times whether they're even journalists, plagiarising other stories, getting sensationalised stories from Facebook, Snapchat and WhatsApp videos. When some newspapers have contact details asking you to give them some stories you know there's very little journalism going on there.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 6091 - 24/10/2020 12:26:29    2300719

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Replying To essmac:  "Correct. Having lived and worked among GAA haters in Dublin for decades, the anti Irish culture folks do exist, though, in my view, their numbers are diminishing. I worked in middle class white collar environments in Dublin, and their guard was down, as they assumed (wrongly) that GAA people were all blue collar, so I had a fascinating (and depressing) education in posh Irish cultural attitudes. The sniggering about "the Gah" and "diddley-aye" music. The natural assumption that wild GAA fans would vandalise their cars and property after matches in Croke Park. The faux concerns about the supposed "violence and thuggery" of Gaelic matches. The air of amused contempt on learning that I followed GAA, as if I wasn't yet fully civilised. The cultural loneliness of not being able to chat about a match with any colleagues, unless you were lucky enough to have a Kerry colleague as among all the yahs. (Kerry fans are, in my view, the most knowledgeable and the most objective / hard-headed GAA fans in the country.) Essentially, these anti GAA / anti trad people have inherited, and parrot, the attitudes of the English from 150 years earlier. They live in a sad and bitter little post-colonial bubble of posh bigotry which has direct cultural links right back to the establishment of the Pale and to the Statutes of Kilkenny. When I worked in white collar London, no English person had a clue about the GAA of course, but they were invariably open-minded and interested, with none of the petty snobbishness of their Irish counterparts.

But the posh Dubs (they never describe themselves as "Dubs" of course - and with that type of accent, it'd be pronounced "Dabs" anyway lol) are not the only anti-GAA cohort. The working class Dublin Premiership fan boy is even more bigoted; though the guys with a primary interest in local soccer tend to be grand.

Nor is it accurate, as some posters have done, to ascribe such attitudes to "the left". I'm afraid that the anti-GAA attitude co-exists naturally with a right wing, pro partition, anti Nationalist, middle class viewpoint. The GAA is also seen as representative of working class and rural culture, hence the Dublin middle class desire to distance yourself from the GAA is a way also of affirming your social status. For the Premiership fan boy, it's a way of affirming that you're not a yokel.

The reality is that, for varying reasons, the middle class right and the trendy left each have their reasons for dissing the GAA. It's quite contrived, and simply incorrect, to suggest that the anti GAA mentality is confined to a particular type of politics.

On a more positive note, my perception is that the anti-GAA cohort in the Irish urban middle class is in steep decline. In this century, it's been remarkable to see posh youngsters on Southside Luases carrying hurls.

It's why, even after 5 years of All Ireland misery, I never really begrudge the Dubs. And with the Tyrone team's safety-first brand of football (the Tyrone team plays a worse brand of football than the Tyrone clubs), it's just as well I don't mind the Dubs, as Tyrone's conservative style of play won't do much about it any time soon ..."
Thanks essmac. Your post was well worth reading.

Greengrass (Louth) - Posts: 5410 - 24/10/2020 12:48:29    2300723

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Replying To essmac:  "Correct. Having lived and worked among GAA haters in Dublin for decades, the anti Irish culture folks do exist, though, in my view, their numbers are diminishing. I worked in middle class white collar environments in Dublin, and their guard was down, as they assumed (wrongly) that GAA people were all blue collar, so I had a fascinating (and depressing) education in posh Irish cultural attitudes. The sniggering about "the Gah" and "diddley-aye" music. The natural assumption that wild GAA fans would vandalise their cars and property after matches in Croke Park. The faux concerns about the supposed "violence and thuggery" of Gaelic matches. The air of amused contempt on learning that I followed GAA, as if I wasn't yet fully civilised. The cultural loneliness of not being able to chat about a match with any colleagues, unless you were lucky enough to have a Kerry colleague as among all the yahs. (Kerry fans are, in my view, the most knowledgeable and the most objective / hard-headed GAA fans in the country.) Essentially, these anti GAA / anti trad people have inherited, and parrot, the attitudes of the English from 150 years earlier. They live in a sad and bitter little post-colonial bubble of posh bigotry which has direct cultural links right back to the establishment of the Pale and to the Statutes of Kilkenny. When I worked in white collar London, no English person had a clue about the GAA of course, but they were invariably open-minded and interested, with none of the petty snobbishness of their Irish counterparts.

But the posh Dubs (they never describe themselves as "Dubs" of course - and with that type of accent, it'd be pronounced "Dabs" anyway lol) are not the only anti-GAA cohort. The working class Dublin Premiership fan boy is even more bigoted; though the guys with a primary interest in local soccer tend to be grand.

Nor is it accurate, as some posters have done, to ascribe such attitudes to "the left". I'm afraid that the anti-GAA attitude co-exists naturally with a right wing, pro partition, anti Nationalist, middle class viewpoint. The GAA is also seen as representative of working class and rural culture, hence the Dublin middle class desire to distance yourself from the GAA is a way also of affirming your social status. For the Premiership fan boy, it's a way of affirming that you're not a yokel.

The reality is that, for varying reasons, the middle class right and the trendy left each have their reasons for dissing the GAA. It's quite contrived, and simply incorrect, to suggest that the anti GAA mentality is confined to a particular type of politics.

On a more positive note, my perception is that the anti-GAA cohort in the Irish urban middle class is in steep decline. In this century, it's been remarkable to see posh youngsters on Southside Luases carrying hurls.

It's why, even after 5 years of All Ireland misery, I never really begrudge the Dubs. And with the Tyrone team's safety-first brand of football (the Tyrone team plays a worse brand of football than the Tyrone clubs), it's just as well I don't mind the Dubs, as Tyrone's conservative style of play won't do much about it any time soon ..."
That's a savage analysis Essmac. Great post.

Morty (Westmeath) - Posts: 203 - 24/10/2020 14:44:45    2300746

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Virtually every team sport has had to alter and change it's competition's to crown it's yearly winners. Champions league went to 1 off knock out matches on neutral grounds, rugby had teams dropping out from various competition's, various US sports reduced amount of games or reduced playoff teams and some soccer league's in Europe just stopped and crowned the league leaders as champions. The GAA is a tiny organisation by comparison but it has employees to pay and you may call it greed but they need to get money in to survive. Look at the IRFU with a 35million euro hole and the trouble they are in-they have created a new competition with other rugby unions, is that Mickey mouse and greed in your opinion. If it's greed you want look at the Premier league and their antics in the past couple of weeks
Anyway as a Limerick fan I'm looking forward to the weekend and surely all sports fans can enjoy whatever sports they love and take pur mind's of Covid and the whole stupid blame game this country is involved in at the moment.
updwell (Limerick) - Posts: 403 - 23/10/2020 23:22:46
Spot on

You're having a laugh, the media is embarrassingly left wing in this sad little island.
lilypad (Kildare) - Posts: 1332 - 23/10/2020 23:58:52
How the hell is media embarrassingly left wing? And how is Ireland a "sad little island"?

Using the term "mickey mouse" wasnt to make little of just the format. Its the whole idea of running a competition at the back end of the year under miserable conditions during lockdown just for the sake of it , to tick a few boxes. It shows how much the organisation values its top flight players.
borisdblade (Westmeath) - Posts: 147 - 24/10/2020 01:47:25
But using the term "mickey mouse" is making little of the format and playing the games now isnt just for the sake of it. So should we have just waited until next year to play? It is safe to play according to the health experts so why shouldnt games be played?

I wonder will the anti GAA mob on social media be also calling for rugby to be called to a halt due to the 12 barbarians players breaking covid protocols and their game against England been cancelled.somehow I doubt it
Firstly I'm aware amateur and professional have to be viewed differently and personally I'm fan of rugby the same as I am of GAA and soccer so don't want rugby to be viewed harshly, but the opportunism of the anti GAA mob on social media is obvious as much as it is tiredism, I wouldn't rule out alot of these people complaining possibly breaking restrictions in their personal lives having friends over for dinner etc.
wexico15 (Wexford) - Posts: 2424 - 24/10/2020 02:24:00
Barbarians are a one off team. The players come together for a week or two and play. And thats in england and not compareable now is it.

The media is not significantly right wing. Most media types in Dublin might not be full on socialists but they share the same smug progressive ideology. You'd think PBP were popular all over given how much time is afforded to them by RTE. The reality is that they only a few TDs from Dublin.
Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 78 - 24/10/2020 07:49:01
the irish people have overwhelmingly voted centre and centre right parties throughout history. The media reflects much of that. You only have to look at many columnists and commentators who are very much right orientated be that Breda O Brien, Ciara Kelly etc

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 2276 - 24/10/2020 14:54:25    2300748

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Correct. Having lived and worked among GAA haters in Dublin for decades, the anti Irish culture folks do exist, though, in my view, their numbers are diminishing. I worked in middle class white collar environments in Dublin, and their guard was down, as they assumed (wrongly) that GAA people were all blue collar, so I had a fascinating (and depressing) education in posh Irish cultural attitudes. The sniggering about "the Gah" and "diddley-aye" music. The natural assumption that wild GAA fans would vandalise their cars and property after matches in Croke Park. The faux concerns about the supposed "violence and thuggery" of Gaelic matches. The air of amused contempt on learning that I followed GAA, as if I wasn't yet fully civilised. The cultural loneliness of not being able to chat about a match with any colleagues, unless you were lucky enough to have a Kerry colleague as among all the yahs. (Kerry fans are, in my view, the most knowledgeable and the most objective / hard-headed GAA fans in the country.) Essentially, these anti GAA / anti trad people have inherited, and parrot, the attitudes of the English from 150 years earlier. They live in a sad and bitter little post-colonial bubble of posh bigotry which has direct cultural links right back to the establishment of the Pale and to the Statutes of Kilkenny. When I worked in white collar London, no English person had a clue about the GAA of course, but they were invariably open-minded and interested, with none of the petty snobbishness of their Irish counterparts.
But the posh Dubs (they never describe themselves as "Dubs" of course - and with that type of accent, it'd be pronounced "Dabs" anyway lol) are not the only anti-GAA cohort. The working class Dublin Premiership fan boy is even more bigoted; though the guys with a primary interest in local soccer tend to be grand.
Nor is it accurate, as some posters have done, to ascribe such attitudes to "the left". I'm afraid that the anti-GAA attitude co-exists naturally with a right wing, pro partition, anti Nationalist, middle class viewpoint. The GAA is also seen as representative of working class and rural culture, hence the Dublin middle class desire to distance yourself from the GAA is a way also of affirming your social status. For the Premiership fan boy, it's a way of affirming that you're not a yokel.
The reality is that, for varying reasons, the middle class right and the trendy left each have their reasons for dissing the GAA. It's quite contrived, and simply incorrect, to suggest that the anti GAA mentality is confined to a particular type of politics.
On a more positive note, my perception is that the anti-GAA cohort in the Irish urban middle class is in steep decline. In this century, it's been remarkable to see posh youngsters on Southside Luases carrying hurls.
It's why, even after 5 years of All Ireland misery, I never really begrudge the Dubs. And with the Tyrone team's safety-first brand of football (the Tyrone team plays a worse brand of football than the Tyrone clubs), it's just as well I don't mind the Dubs, as Tyrone's conservative style of play won't do much about it any time soon ...
essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 760 - 24/10/2020 09:36:52
hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
That has to be a parody right?

Yes there is bias against the GAA within journalism but it is not for idealistic reasons.
Journalists are going mad for click bait stories now more than ever. The GAA or any other game that is playing whilst covid 19 is at large, is a story that will sell. This is especially so if there are outbreaks and if other sporting bodies are unable to play while the GAA are.
For instance, the golfing community will feel very hard done by as they are not allowed to play for 6 weeks. Their game is perceived as being elitist and also has had negative press associated with it twice in relation to covid headlines. IF you audit their game, you will find that there is virtually zero chance of getting covid on the course.
Can we say the same about the GAA as a full contact sport and the spread of covid?
"Attacks" on the GAA by journalists are measured and calibrated commentaries. Same with rugby and soccer.
the GAA is a very easy target for journalism as the organisation enjoys money from the tax payer, sponsorship and finally from fund raising at local levels. It is impossible not to have an opinion about any organisation who enjoys all 3 levels of income mentioned above. (not to mention gate receipts).
Yes there are elements of envy here, I will not deny this.
Donegalman (None) - Posts: 3745 - 24/10/2020 11:05:52
Golf is completely elitist. link

Incredible how you are wrong in nearly every post. To you Irish media are right wing (they must be the most left wing and woke of any EU country), rugby in Ireland is the everymans game as opposed to hyped up and purely elitist....it's almost impressive.
Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 771 - 24/10/2020 11:52:50
No way at all is irish media most left wing in the EU.

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 2276 - 24/10/2020 15:00:19    2300750

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Replying To Breezy:  "Can you explain what you believe left wing means? If you are talking about the so called "woke agenda" or whatever its called thats not left wing. God we re getting worse than the USA for making everything left/right.

Left wing is an economic philosophy which few in Ireland are, socially liberal is what you are thinking of"
The meaning of left and right with the younger generation has taken on a life of its own. I think its pretty obvious at this stage that you're not permitted to have a middle or neutral view anymore.
In the old days it was the right v normal people now its the left against normal.

lilypad (Kildare) - Posts: 1363 - 24/10/2020 15:28:57    2300753

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Replying To SaffronDon:  "All this left/right sh*te really is absorbing a lot of people. Does every human act have to be a political gesture now?!"
Exactly

lilypad (Kildare) - Posts: 1363 - 24/10/2020 15:30:54    2300755

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Replying To KillingFields:  "Virtually every team sport has had to alter and change it's competition's to crown it's yearly winners. Champions league went to 1 off knock out matches on neutral grounds, rugby had teams dropping out from various competition's, various US sports reduced amount of games or reduced playoff teams and some soccer league's in Europe just stopped and crowned the league leaders as champions. The GAA is a tiny organisation by comparison but it has employees to pay and you may call it greed but they need to get money in to survive. Look at the IRFU with a 35million euro hole and the trouble they are in-they have created a new competition with other rugby unions, is that Mickey mouse and greed in your opinion. If it's greed you want look at the Premier league and their antics in the past couple of weeks
Anyway as a Limerick fan I'm looking forward to the weekend and surely all sports fans can enjoy whatever sports they love and take pur mind's of Covid and the whole stupid blame game this country is involved in at the moment.
updwell (Limerick) - Posts: 403 - 23/10/2020 23:22:46
Spot on

You're having a laugh, the media is embarrassingly left wing in this sad little island.
lilypad (Kildare) - Posts: 1332 - 23/10/2020 23:58:52
How the hell is media embarrassingly left wing? And how is Ireland a "sad little island"?

Using the term "mickey mouse" wasnt to make little of just the format. Its the whole idea of running a competition at the back end of the year under miserable conditions during lockdown just for the sake of it , to tick a few boxes. It shows how much the organisation values its top flight players.
borisdblade (Westmeath) - Posts: 147 - 24/10/2020 01:47:25
But using the term "mickey mouse" is making little of the format and playing the games now isnt just for the sake of it. So should we have just waited until next year to play? It is safe to play according to the health experts so why shouldnt games be played?

I wonder will the anti GAA mob on social media be also calling for rugby to be called to a halt due to the 12 barbarians players breaking covid protocols and their game against England been cancelled.somehow I doubt it
Firstly I'm aware amateur and professional have to be viewed differently and personally I'm fan of rugby the same as I am of GAA and soccer so don't want rugby to be viewed harshly, but the opportunism of the anti GAA mob on social media is obvious as much as it is tiredism, I wouldn't rule out alot of these people complaining possibly breaking restrictions in their personal lives having friends over for dinner etc.
wexico15 (Wexford) - Posts: 2424 - 24/10/2020 02:24:00
Barbarians are a one off team. The players come together for a week or two and play. And thats in england and not compareable now is it.

The media is not significantly right wing. Most media types in Dublin might not be full on socialists but they share the same smug progressive ideology. You'd think PBP were popular all over given how much time is afforded to them by RTE. The reality is that they only a few TDs from Dublin.
Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 78 - 24/10/2020 07:49:01
the irish people have overwhelmingly voted centre and centre right parties throughout history. The media reflects much of that. You only have to look at many columnists and commentators who are very much right orientated be that Breda O Brien, Ciara Kelly etc"
We're talking about today and not what happened in the past. Breda is irrelevant.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 263 - 24/10/2020 15:57:10    2300773

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Crinigan this is a heartfelt plea to you . Could you please stop using that b******t , new age word "woke." It epitomises all these new age words and phrases such as "going forward", "growing the business" and that ridiculous phrase, "not fit for purpose." God but I hate that phrase. What was wrong with the word the elegant word "inadequate"? Sorry Crinigan for the rant but instead of"woke" could we not continue to use the phrase "socially aware"?

Greengrass (Louth) - Posts: 5410 - 24/10/2020 16:15:55    2300784

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Replying To KillingFields:  "Correct. Having lived and worked among GAA haters in Dublin for decades, the anti Irish culture folks do exist, though, in my view, their numbers are diminishing. I worked in middle class white collar environments in Dublin, and their guard was down, as they assumed (wrongly) that GAA people were all blue collar, so I had a fascinating (and depressing) education in posh Irish cultural attitudes. The sniggering about "the Gah" and "diddley-aye" music. The natural assumption that wild GAA fans would vandalise their cars and property after matches in Croke Park. The faux concerns about the supposed "violence and thuggery" of Gaelic matches. The air of amused contempt on learning that I followed GAA, as if I wasn't yet fully civilised. The cultural loneliness of not being able to chat about a match with any colleagues, unless you were lucky enough to have a Kerry colleague as among all the yahs. (Kerry fans are, in my view, the most knowledgeable and the most objective / hard-headed GAA fans in the country.) Essentially, these anti GAA / anti trad people have inherited, and parrot, the attitudes of the English from 150 years earlier. They live in a sad and bitter little post-colonial bubble of posh bigotry which has direct cultural links right back to the establishment of the Pale and to the Statutes of Kilkenny. When I worked in white collar London, no English person had a clue about the GAA of course, but they were invariably open-minded and interested, with none of the petty snobbishness of their Irish counterparts.
But the posh Dubs (they never describe themselves as "Dubs" of course - and with that type of accent, it'd be pronounced "Dabs" anyway lol) are not the only anti-GAA cohort. The working class Dublin Premiership fan boy is even more bigoted; though the guys with a primary interest in local soccer tend to be grand.
Nor is it accurate, as some posters have done, to ascribe such attitudes to "the left". I'm afraid that the anti-GAA attitude co-exists naturally with a right wing, pro partition, anti Nationalist, middle class viewpoint. The GAA is also seen as representative of working class and rural culture, hence the Dublin middle class desire to distance yourself from the GAA is a way also of affirming your social status. For the Premiership fan boy, it's a way of affirming that you're not a yokel.
The reality is that, for varying reasons, the middle class right and the trendy left each have their reasons for dissing the GAA. It's quite contrived, and simply incorrect, to suggest that the anti GAA mentality is confined to a particular type of politics.
On a more positive note, my perception is that the anti-GAA cohort in the Irish urban middle class is in steep decline. In this century, it's been remarkable to see posh youngsters on Southside Luases carrying hurls.
It's why, even after 5 years of All Ireland misery, I never really begrudge the Dubs. And with the Tyrone team's safety-first brand of football (the Tyrone team plays a worse brand of football than the Tyrone clubs), it's just as well I don't mind the Dubs, as Tyrone's conservative style of play won't do much about it any time soon ...
essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 760 - 24/10/2020 09:36:52
hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
That has to be a parody right?

Yes there is bias against the GAA within journalism but it is not for idealistic reasons.
Journalists are going mad for click bait stories now more than ever. The GAA or any other game that is playing whilst covid 19 is at large, is a story that will sell. This is especially so if there are outbreaks and if other sporting bodies are unable to play while the GAA are.
For instance, the golfing community will feel very hard done by as they are not allowed to play for 6 weeks. Their game is perceived as being elitist and also has had negative press associated with it twice in relation to covid headlines. IF you audit their game, you will find that there is virtually zero chance of getting covid on the course.
Can we say the same about the GAA as a full contact sport and the spread of covid?
"Attacks" on the GAA by journalists are measured and calibrated commentaries. Same with rugby and soccer.
the GAA is a very easy target for journalism as the organisation enjoys money from the tax payer, sponsorship and finally from fund raising at local levels. It is impossible not to have an opinion about any organisation who enjoys all 3 levels of income mentioned above. (not to mention gate receipts).
Yes there are elements of envy here, I will not deny this.
Donegalman (None) - Posts: 3745 - 24/10/2020 11:05:52
Golf is completely elitist. link

Incredible how you are wrong in nearly every post. To you Irish media are right wing (they must be the most left wing and woke of any EU country), rugby in Ireland is the everymans game as opposed to hyped up and purely elitist....it's almost impressive.
Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 771 - 24/10/2020 11:52:50
No way at all is irish media most left wing in the EU."
In no other country in the EU would Ibrahim Halawa be greeted as a hero on national tv and radio. Was simply extraordinary.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 1045 - 24/10/2020 16:40:25    2300807

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Replying To Greengrass:  "Crinigan this is a heartfelt plea to you . Could you please stop using that b******t , new age word "woke." It epitomises all these new age words and phrases such as "going forward", "growing the business" and that ridiculous phrase, "not fit for purpose." God but I hate that phrase. What was wrong with the word the elegant word "inadequate"? Sorry Crinigan for the rant but instead of"woke" could we not continue to use the phrase "socially aware"?"
Socially aware is worse. Can we not say 'too cool for school gobshi+e'?!!! Seriously, woke? Sending a few black lives matter gifs on WhatsApp and putting a few anti-racism photos and slogans on Facebook doesn't make you an activist, questionable even if you're a reactivist. And at the same time badmouthing travellers and immigrants and verbally abusing them. If you want to be concerned about racism putting stuff on social media won't stop some cops in the US being racist. But when your in LIDL or ALDI and one of the African or Eastern European staff might sound like they're being abrupt to you, don't look down their noses on them and abuse them but think they're working flat out in these challenging times dealing with us a in challenging times and their skin colour or nationality doesn't stop them having a bad day too. Start there. Be nice to people even if their not always nice back.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 6091 - 24/10/2020 16:53:33    2300817

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Replying To Crinigan:  "
Replying To KillingFields:  "Correct. Having lived and worked among GAA haters in Dublin for decades, the anti Irish culture folks do exist, though, in my view, their numbers are diminishing. I worked in middle class white collar environments in Dublin, and their guard was down, as they assumed (wrongly) that GAA people were all blue collar, so I had a fascinating (and depressing) education in posh Irish cultural attitudes. The sniggering about "the Gah" and "diddley-aye" music. The natural assumption that wild GAA fans would vandalise their cars and property after matches in Croke Park. The faux concerns about the supposed "violence and thuggery" of Gaelic matches. The air of amused contempt on learning that I followed GAA, as if I wasn't yet fully civilised. The cultural loneliness of not being able to chat about a match with any colleagues, unless you were lucky enough to have a Kerry colleague as among all the yahs. (Kerry fans are, in my view, the most knowledgeable and the most objective / hard-headed GAA fans in the country.) Essentially, these anti GAA / anti trad people have inherited, and parrot, the attitudes of the English from 150 years earlier. They live in a sad and bitter little post-colonial bubble of posh bigotry which has direct cultural links right back to the establishment of the Pale and to the Statutes of Kilkenny. When I worked in white collar London, no English person had a clue about the GAA of course, but they were invariably open-minded and interested, with none of the petty snobbishness of their Irish counterparts.
But the posh Dubs (they never describe themselves as "Dubs" of course - and with that type of accent, it'd be pronounced "Dabs" anyway lol) are not the only anti-GAA cohort. The working class Dublin Premiership fan boy is even more bigoted; though the guys with a primary interest in local soccer tend to be grand.
Nor is it accurate, as some posters have done, to ascribe such attitudes to "the left". I'm afraid that the anti-GAA attitude co-exists naturally with a right wing, pro partition, anti Nationalist, middle class viewpoint. The GAA is also seen as representative of working class and rural culture, hence the Dublin middle class desire to distance yourself from the GAA is a way also of affirming your social status. For the Premiership fan boy, it's a way of affirming that you're not a yokel.
The reality is that, for varying reasons, the middle class right and the trendy left each have their reasons for dissing the GAA. It's quite contrived, and simply incorrect, to suggest that the anti GAA mentality is confined to a particular type of politics.
On a more positive note, my perception is that the anti-GAA cohort in the Irish urban middle class is in steep decline. In this century, it's been remarkable to see posh youngsters on Southside Luases carrying hurls.
It's why, even after 5 years of All Ireland misery, I never really begrudge the Dubs. And with the Tyrone team's safety-first brand of football (the Tyrone team plays a worse brand of football than the Tyrone clubs), it's just as well I don't mind the Dubs, as Tyrone's conservative style of play won't do much about it any time soon ...
essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 760 - 24/10/2020 09:36:52
hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
That has to be a parody right?

Yes there is bias against the GAA within journalism but it is not for idealistic reasons.
Journalists are going mad for click bait stories now more than ever. The GAA or any other game that is playing whilst covid 19 is at large, is a story that will sell. This is especially so if there are outbreaks and if other sporting bodies are unable to play while the GAA are.
For instance, the golfing community will feel very hard done by as they are not allowed to play for 6 weeks. Their game is perceived as being elitist and also has had negative press associated with it twice in relation to covid headlines. IF you audit their game, you will find that there is virtually zero chance of getting covid on the course.
Can we say the same about the GAA as a full contact sport and the spread of covid?
"Attacks" on the GAA by journalists are measured and calibrated commentaries. Same with rugby and soccer.
the GAA is a very easy target for journalism as the organisation enjoys money from the tax payer, sponsorship and finally from fund raising at local levels. It is impossible not to have an opinion about any organisation who enjoys all 3 levels of income mentioned above. (not to mention gate receipts).
Yes there are elements of envy here, I will not deny this.
Donegalman (None) - Posts: 3745 - 24/10/2020 11:05:52
Golf is completely elitist. link

Incredible how you are wrong in nearly every post. To you Irish media are right wing (they must be the most left wing and woke of any EU country), rugby in Ireland is the everymans game as opposed to hyped up and purely elitist....it's almost impressive.
Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 771 - 24/10/2020 11:52:50
No way at all is irish media most left wing in the EU."
In no other country in the EU would Ibrahim Halawa be greeted as a hero on national tv and radio. Was simply extraordinary."
What was extraordinary about it?

Greengrass (Louth) - Posts: 5410 - 24/10/2020 16:59:30    2300824

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Replying To Greengrass:  "Crinigan this is a heartfelt plea to you . Could you please stop using that b******t , new age word "woke." It epitomises all these new age words and phrases such as "going forward", "growing the business" and that ridiculous phrase, "not fit for purpose." God but I hate that phrase. What was wrong with the word the elegant word "inadequate"? Sorry Crinigan for the rant but instead of"woke" could we not continue to use the phrase "socially aware"?"
Woke is certainly not socially aware.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 1045 - 24/10/2020 17:29:31    2300847

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The meaning of left and right with the younger generation has taken on a life of its own. I think its pretty obvious at this stage that you're not permitted to have a middle or neutral view anymore.
In the old days it was the right v normal people now its the left against normal.
lilypad (Kildare) - Posts: 1334 - 24/10/2020 15:28:57
What do you think is normal?

We're talking about today and not what happened in the past. Breda is irrelevant.
Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 80 - 24/10/2020 15:57:10
Herself, Iona David Quinn etc are not irrelevant unfortunately through their role/actions in the media.
In no other country in the EU would Ibrahim Halawa be greeted as a hero on national tv and radio. Was simply extraordinary.
Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 773 - 24/10/2020 16:40:25
How was he greated as a hero?

Socially aware is worse. Can we not say 'too cool for school gobshi+e'?!!! Seriously, woke? Sending a few black lives matter gifs on WhatsApp and putting a few anti-racism photos and slogans on Facebook doesn't make you an activist, questionable even if you're a reactivist. And at the same time badmouthing travellers and immigrants and verbally abusing them. If you want to be concerned about racism putting stuff on social media won't stop some cops in the US being racist. But when your in LIDL or ALDI and one of the African or Eastern European staff might sound like they're being abrupt to you, don't look down their noses on them and abuse them but think they're working flat out in these challenging times dealing with us a in challenging times and their skin colour or nationality doesn't stop them having a bad day too. Start there. Be nice to people even if their not always nice back.
GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 5870 - 24/10/2020 16:53:33
Whats wrong with being socially aware?
Ive a lot of friends who are socially aware and they do lot more than post on whatsapp, facebook.

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 2276 - 24/10/2020 17:55:06    2300860

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