National Forum

Cross Country

(Oldest Posts First)

Anyone else ever heard of this cross country?

https://www.rte.ie/sport/gaa/2020/0810/1158427-o-muircheartaigh-looks-for-new-order-in-unnatural-year/

Canuckgael (USA) - Posts: 25 - 11/08/2020 03:41:26    2287195

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Replying To Canuckgael:  "Anyone else ever heard of this cross country?

https://www.rte.ie/sport/gaa/2020/0810/1158427-o-muircheartaigh-looks-for-new-order-in-unnatural-year/"
Most ball games came from something like this. Soccer had it too and there were 2 types of hurling one called hurling for goals and the other hurling over fields

Breezy (Limerick) - Posts: 952 - 11/08/2020 11:17:28    2287208

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There are a few similar games still played today. Usually once a year.

Ashbourne (Shrove Tuesday), Haxey (in January) and Jedburgh (February, I think, maybe not) spring to mind.

lionofludesch (Down) - Posts: 352 - 11/08/2020 18:05:30    2287262

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This is from Wikipedia:

While Gaelic football as it is known today dates back to the late 19th century, various kinds of football were played in Ireland before this time. The first legal reference to football in Ireland was in 1308, when John McCrocan, a spectator at a football game at Novum Castrum de Leuan (the New Castle of the Lyons or Newcastle) was charged with accidentally stabbing a player named William Bernard. A field near Newcastle, South Dublin is still known as the football field.The Statute of Galway of 1527 allowed the playing of "foot balle" and archery but banned "'hokie'-the hurling of a little ball with sticks or staves" as well as other sports.

By the 17th century, the situation had changed considerably. The games had grown in popularity and were widely played. This was due to the patronage of the gentry.[citation needed] Now instead of opposing the games it was the gentry and the ruling class who were serving as patrons of the games. Games were organised between landlords with each team comprising 20 or more tenants. Wagers were commonplace with purses of up to 100 guineas (Prior, 1997).

The earliest record of a recognised precursor to the modern game date from a match in County Meath in 1670, in which catching and kicking the ball was permitted.

However even "foot-ball" was banned by the severe Sunday Observance Act of 1695, which imposed a fine of one shilling (a substantial amount at the time) for those caught playing sports. It proved difficult, if not impossible, for the authorities to enforce the Act and the earliest recorded inter-county match in Ireland was one between Louth and Meath, at Slane, in 1712, about which the poet James Dall McCuairt wrote a poem of 88 verses beginning "Ba haigeanta".

Cockney_Cat (UK) - Posts: 1021 - 11/08/2020 21:15:23    2287275

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Replying To Cockney_Cat:  "This is from Wikipedia:

While Gaelic football as it is known today dates back to the late 19th century, various kinds of football were played in Ireland before this time. The first legal reference to football in Ireland was in 1308, when John McCrocan, a spectator at a football game at Novum Castrum de Leuan (the New Castle of the Lyons or Newcastle) was charged with accidentally stabbing a player named William Bernard. A field near Newcastle, South Dublin is still known as the football field.The Statute of Galway of 1527 allowed the playing of "foot balle" and archery but banned "'hokie'-the hurling of a little ball with sticks or staves" as well as other sports.

By the 17th century, the situation had changed considerably. The games had grown in popularity and were widely played. This was due to the patronage of the gentry.[citation needed
Now instead of opposing the games it was the gentry and the ruling class who were serving as patrons of the games. Games were organised between landlords with each team comprising 20 or more tenants. Wagers were commonplace with purses of up to 100 guineas (Prior, 1997).

The earliest record of a recognised precursor to the modern game date from a match in County Meath in 1670, in which catching and kicking the ball was permitted.

However even "foot-ball" was banned by the severe Sunday Observance Act of 1695, which imposed a fine of one shilling (a substantial amount at the time) for those caught playing sports. It proved difficult, if not impossible, for the authorities to enforce the Act and the earliest recorded inter-county match in Ireland was one between Louth and Meath, at Slane, in 1712, about which the poet James Dall McCuairt wrote a poem of 88 verses beginning "Ba haigeanta".
"]Was there a hotly disputed goal at the end of that game ?

lionofludesch (Down) - Posts: 352 - 12/08/2020 12:18:54    2287349

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