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I personally have a lot of admiration for Bobby. He gave the ultimate sacrifice for his cause and his beliefs, at a very young age cast into jail and forced to spend years behind bars until his death. His election to MP from inside prison was truly historic and shows his standing in society at that time. A leader amongst his cause and a figure who will live on in the memory forever.

However, wow, what a bizarre post. With due respect Ollie, and I enjoy your insight, but I don't care about the coincidence of his supporting Aston Villa. I don't understand the point of this post. What does it matter? What is the point of putting this message across on a GAA forum nonetheless? It just seems bizarrely ironic.

Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account; its a part of the Irish condition to be tied at the hip and bombarded with British culture, often to our betterment, in spite of our political beliefs often being vastly different in the extreme.

Young_gael (Meath) - Posts: 321 - 15/05/2020 14:57:37    2278242

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Replying To Ollie2:  "Speaking of red thumbs, thanks very much for giving me my first red thumb."
Whatever you think but I don't do red thumbing.
It's a daft notion but makes the minions feel better about themselves. I'm above all that silly stuff.

catch22 (USA) - Posts: 1529 - 15/05/2020 15:38:42    2278248

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Bobby's legacy is probably in making folk think "actually, the political route is quite a good one to use, so it is."

lionofludesch (Down) - Posts: 367 - 15/05/2020 16:04:35    2278253

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Replying To Young_gael:  "I personally have a lot of admiration for Bobby. He gave the ultimate sacrifice for his cause and his beliefs, at a very young age cast into jail and forced to spend years behind bars until his death. His election to MP from inside prison was truly historic and shows his standing in society at that time. A leader amongst his cause and a figure who will live on in the memory forever.

However, wow, what a bizarre post. With due respect Ollie, and I enjoy your insight, but I don't care about the coincidence of his supporting Aston Villa. I don't understand the point of this post. What does it matter? What is the point of putting this message across on a GAA forum nonetheless? It just seems bizarrely ironic.

Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account; its a part of the Irish condition to be tied at the hip and bombarded with British culture, often to our betterment, in spite of our political beliefs often being vastly different in the extreme."
Young_gael I have something in common with you. I also find your post bizarre and some what Ironic as well. You have a lot of admiration for Bobby but you could not care about him supporting Aston Villa. If you did not care you would not be putting up your little rant on here. I suppose it's different strokes for different fokes.

Ollie2 (Louth) - Posts: 165 - 15/05/2020 17:51:06    2278275

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Replying To Ollie2:  "Young_gael I have something in common with you. I also find your post bizarre and some what Ironic as well. You have a lot of admiration for Bobby but you could not care about him supporting Aston Villa. If you did not care you would not be putting up your little rant on here. I suppose it's different strokes for different fokes."
Ok Ollie, lets have it your way so. I did expressly point out that I tend to like your posts and I find them insightful, but on this occasion I did not. I essentially told you that I wasn't going on a rant but if you're looking to roll in the gutter with people who apply a critical opinion to your posts, then there's no way I can stop you or tell you that you're misguided for taking that tone. Go ahead and join the reams of folks on this forum who are like that. Its not a case of different strokes for different folks* either, for example a lot of people have admiration for Abraham Lincoln, but by your logic that means that we all should care that he supported, for argument's sake, Accrington Stanley, who won such and such a game the day he died! Wow, what coincidence! It isn't a case of different strokes for different folks, its nonsensical that in a forum based around the culture and ideas of the GAA that such a fact should be consequential. Bobby will not be remembered for supporting simultaneously supporting Aston Villa whilst being a republican champion to thousands, millions even. That was my meaning of irony. Perhaps it was lost on you and you just wanted the row.

Young_gael (Meath) - Posts: 321 - 15/05/2020 18:27:43    2278283

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Replying To Young_gael:  "I personally have a lot of admiration for Bobby. He gave the ultimate sacrifice for his cause and his beliefs, at a very young age cast into jail and forced to spend years behind bars until his death. His election to MP from inside prison was truly historic and shows his standing in society at that time. A leader amongst his cause and a figure who will live on in the memory forever.

However, wow, what a bizarre post. With due respect Ollie, and I enjoy your insight, but I don't care about the coincidence of his supporting Aston Villa. I don't understand the point of this post. What does it matter? What is the point of putting this message across on a GAA forum nonetheless? It just seems bizarrely ironic.

Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account; its a part of the Irish condition to be tied at the hip and bombarded with British culture, often to our betterment, in spite of our political beliefs often being vastly different in the extreme."
Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account;

Why are they peculiarities and oddities?

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 5873 - 15/05/2020 18:37:43    2278288

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Replying To GreenandRed:  "Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account;

Why are they peculiarities and oddities?"
They are peculiarities and oddities, in my view, as in spite of the nationalist slant of a great many in our society; the fierce protectionism of our history and in particular our pride in revolutionist history, that we all enjoy watching English sports, for example Rugby, Cricket, and of course the ubiquitous soccer. Many wear the sports gear of English sporting clubs, many spend time in their lives living and working in Britain, many people watch soap operas depicting typical life in the English cities or countryside, many of us also seem to have an interest in British royalty ( I certainly do not), the sense of humour is similar. The list could go on and on but the crux of my point is that although we are different and aspire to be different in political/national terms and of course we ARE different, we (Ireland) are tied at the hip with their culture and their place in the world and always have been, so it is very peculiar and odd given the huge resentment in purely human terms that is often found on a street's corner.

I want to stress that for the benefit of some people on this forum that I am not putting across a message in support of, or encouraging any kind of particular view toward our country or our neighbours. Im just pointing out a strange element of being Irish.

Young_gael (Meath) - Posts: 321 - 15/05/2020 18:59:09    2278291

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Replying To Young_gael:  "Ok Ollie, lets have it your way so. I did expressly point out that I tend to like your posts and I find them insightful, but on this occasion I did not. I essentially told you that I wasn't going on a rant but if you're looking to roll in the gutter with people who apply a critical opinion to your posts, then there's no way I can stop you or tell you that you're misguided for taking that tone. Go ahead and join the reams of folks on this forum who are like that. Its not a case of different strokes for different folks* either, for example a lot of people have admiration for Abraham Lincoln, but by your logic that means that we all should care that he supported, for argument's sake, Accrington Stanley, who won such and such a game the day he died! Wow, what coincidence! It isn't a case of different strokes for different folks, its nonsensical that in a forum based around the culture and ideas of the GAA that such a fact should be consequential. Bobby will not be remembered for supporting simultaneously supporting Aston Villa whilst being a republican champion to thousands, millions even. That was my meaning of irony. Perhaps it was lost on you and you just wanted the row."
Young_Gael you are the one that had a go at me. I would never start a row. It's not in me. My whole point is that not a lot of people knew that Bobby Sands was an Aston Villa. And after 71 years when they finally win the league, he dies 3 days later. I think it's lost on your good self.

Ollie2 (Louth) - Posts: 165 - 15/05/2020 19:03:29    2278293

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Replying To Young_gael:  "
Replying To GreenandRed:  "Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account;

Why are they peculiarities and oddities?"
They are peculiarities and oddities, in my view, as in spite of the nationalist slant of a great many in our society; the fierce protectionism of our history and in particular our pride in revolutionist history, that we all enjoy watching English sports, for example Rugby, Cricket, and of course the ubiquitous soccer. Many wear the sports gear of English sporting clubs, many spend time in their lives living and working in Britain, many people watch soap operas depicting typical life in the English cities or countryside, many of us also seem to have an interest in British royalty ( I certainly do not), the sense of humour is similar. The list could go on and on but the crux of my point is that although we are different and aspire to be different in political/national terms and of course we ARE different, we (Ireland) are tied at the hip with their culture and their place in the world and always have been, so it is very peculiar and odd given the huge resentment in purely human terms that is often found on a street's corner.

I want to stress that for the benefit of some people on this forum that I am not putting across a message in support of, or encouraging any kind of particular view toward our country or our neighbours. Im just pointing out a strange element of being Irish."
Such a unique and truly awesome insight....

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 5873 - 15/05/2020 19:59:38    2278297

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Replying To GreenandRed:  "
Replying To Young_gael:  "[quote=GreenandRed:  "Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account;

Why are they peculiarities and oddities?"
They are peculiarities and oddities, in my view, as in spite of the nationalist slant of a great many in our society; the fierce protectionism of our history and in particular our pride in revolutionist history, that we all enjoy watching English sports, for example Rugby, Cricket, and of course the ubiquitous soccer. Many wear the sports gear of English sporting clubs, many spend time in their lives living and working in Britain, many people watch soap operas depicting typical life in the English cities or countryside, many of us also seem to have an interest in British royalty ( I certainly do not), the sense of humour is similar. The list could go on and on but the crux of my point is that although we are different and aspire to be different in political/national terms and of course we ARE different, we (Ireland) are tied at the hip with their culture and their place in the world and always have been, so it is very peculiar and odd given the huge resentment in purely human terms that is often found on a street's corner.

I want to stress that for the benefit of some people on this forum that I am not putting across a message in support of, or encouraging any kind of particular view toward our country or our neighbours. Im just pointing out a strange element of being Irish."
Such a unique and truly awesome insight...."]Well you asked me for an explanation and I gave one to you in good faith! So if there's nothing else to add I suppose we'll leave it there. I don't know what I could have possibly said in the explanation that would have been anyway more clear but something tells me you weren't looking for an explanation at all, rather to run me into a stupor and maybe make me look ridiculous in some moral way over even daring to mention Britain and Ireland in the same sentence, as I fully well expected some posters might.

Young_gael (Meath) - Posts: 321 - 15/05/2020 20:22:38    2278302

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Replying To Young_gael:  "
Replying To GreenandRed:  "[quote=Young_gael:  "[quote=GreenandRed:  "Irish ties and appreciation of British sports and British society are one of the many peculiarities and oddities when our nationalism is taken into account;

Why are they peculiarities and oddities?"
They are peculiarities and oddities, in my view, as in spite of the nationalist slant of a great many in our society; the fierce protectionism of our history and in particular our pride in revolutionist history, that we all enjoy watching English sports, for example Rugby, Cricket, and of course the ubiquitous soccer. Many wear the sports gear of English sporting clubs, many spend time in their lives living and working in Britain, many people watch soap operas depicting typical life in the English cities or countryside, many of us also seem to have an interest in British royalty ( I certainly do not), the sense of humour is similar. The list could go on and on but the crux of my point is that although we are different and aspire to be different in political/national terms and of course we ARE different, we (Ireland) are tied at the hip with their culture and their place in the world and always have been, so it is very peculiar and odd given the huge resentment in purely human terms that is often found on a street's corner.

I want to stress that for the benefit of some people on this forum that I am not putting across a message in support of, or encouraging any kind of particular view toward our country or our neighbours. Im just pointing out a strange element of being Irish."
Such a unique and truly awesome insight...."]Well you asked me for an explanation and I gave one to you in good faith! So if there's nothing else to add I suppose we'll leave it there. I don't know what I could have possibly said in the explanation that would have been anyway more clear but something tells me you weren't looking for an explanation at all, rather to run me into a stupor and maybe make me look ridiculous in some moral way over even daring to mention Britain and Ireland in the same sentence, as I fully well expected some posters might."]You assume too much.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - Posts: 5873 - 15/05/2020 20:44:13    2278306

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Replying To KingdomBoy1:  "There is a Bobby Sands street in Paris as far as I know.

Bobby was a gifted poet and song writer as well."
Rue Bobby Sands is very near the Stade de France, just across from the subway station. Theres very little to see but if you are in the area you should stop by and remember.

ShinerMackey (Tyrone) - Posts: 13 - 15/05/2020 22:43:46    2278315

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Replying To ShinerMackey:  "Rue Bobby Sands is very near the Stade de France, just across from the subway station. Theres very little to see but if you are in the area you should stop by and remember."
Sound man shiner will do, although I'd be happy if the left me go to tralee for now :-)

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - Posts: 11448 - 15/05/2020 23:18:29    2278318

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Replying To ShinerMackey:  "Rue Bobby Sands is very near the Stade de France, just across from the subway station. Theres very little to see but if you are in the area you should stop by and remember."
Iran renamed the street with the British Embassy in Tehran after him.
The embassy ended up having to make a new main door in the back of the building so they wouldnt have to write Bobby Sands on all the mail

Breezy (Limerick) - Posts: 1018 - 16/05/2020 00:29:28    2278321

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Bobby Sands Way, Rockland GAA, New York
Fabulous club..

hannigantiptoe (Roscommon) - Posts: 38 - 16/05/2020 03:21:57    2278331

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Replying To Ollie2:  "Young_Gael you are the one that had a go at me. I would never start a row. It's not in me. My whole point is that not a lot of people knew that Bobby Sands was an Aston Villa. And after 71 years when they finally win the league, he dies 3 days later. I think it's lost on your good self."
Ignore that lad Ollie. When you read between the flowery language in his posts there is rarely ever anything of substance.

The Villa thing adds a bit more poignancy to Bobby's tragic story. How much he could have enjoyed that Villa team if things had been different.

If you haven't read it I recommend the book "nothing but an unfinished song". Excellent read.

Greenfield (Meath) - Posts: 408 - 16/05/2020 08:56:39    2278336

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Replying To Greenfield:  "Ignore that lad Ollie. When you read between the flowery language in his posts there is rarely ever anything of substance.

The Villa thing adds a bit more poignancy to Bobby's tragic story. How much he could have enjoyed that Villa team if things had been different.

If you haven't read it I recommend the book "nothing but an unfinished song". Excellent read."
Bobby Sands also had written Back Home in Derry. What a great song. Ill look out for that book Greenfield. Thanks very much.

Ollie2 (Louth) - Posts: 165 - 16/05/2020 12:35:44    2278366

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Replying To Ollie2:  "Bobby Sands also had written Back Home in Derry. What a great song. Ill look out for that book Greenfield. Thanks very much."
Back home in Derry is a brilliant song Ollie we always sing it in sing songs down the local during lockins.

But I heard the tune is borrowed from another song I think it's called the wreck of the Edmund fitzgerald but not 100%,

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - Posts: 11448 - 16/05/2020 22:20:08    2278429

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Replying To KingdomBoy1:  "Back home in Derry is a brilliant song Ollie we always sing it in sing songs down the local during lockins.

But I heard the tune is borrowed from another song I think it's called the wreck of the Edmund fitzgerald but not 100%,"
You will find that with a lot of Irish tunes KingdomBoy that they are borrowed from another tune. It's a great tune alright.

Ollie2 (Louth) - Posts: 165 - 17/05/2020 15:31:41    2278495

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Replying To Ollie2:  "You will find that with a lot of Irish tunes KingdomBoy that they are borrowed from another tune. It's a great tune alright."
That's true Ollie, they don't make them like that any more.

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - Posts: 11448 - 17/05/2020 16:20:11    2278507

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