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Hurley length?

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Do modern players seem to be using shorter hurleys then ever before. In an interview before the All Ireland I see that Bubbles O'Dwyer uses a 33 inch stick. is this now the norm?

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 16/12/2016 14:36:33    1940557

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Replying To puck_da_sliotar:  "Do modern players seem to be using shorter hurleys then ever before. In an interview before the All Ireland I see that Bubbles O'Dwyer uses a 33 inch stick. is this now the norm?"
Think it's a trend alright, I'm guessing it's to avoid hooks. Dublin's David Treacy is the one that sticks out for me, his hurl looks tiny and he's quite tall.

Mickmick (Dublin) - 16/12/2016 15:25:20    1940566

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Some are , I had it explained to me recently , the pressure to get the ball off in tight areas in the modern game is immense , hence a full swing can be near impossible , plus the death of ground hurling means full length pulling on the ground rarely happens , some of course stick to the longer hurl but you will notice they will shorten their grip when playing .

Damothedub (Dublin) - 16/12/2016 17:23:00    1940581

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I'm in my late 30's now, when I played minor around 1997 I can remember most lads used around 36 inch. Some even 37 inch Seems to have really changed I wonder if it also applies to goalkeepers?

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 16/12/2016 18:04:27    1940589

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The game is played with the ball far closer to the body these days. In years gone by there was far more of what I'd see as less controlled swiping at the ball, both on the ground and in the air. A long hurl held an advantage here, since you could reach the ball further away from you and hit it. These days unless you're desperate it's always, always about getting the ball into the hand and try to make space for yourself to get rid of it by a handpass/ strike from the hand. A long hurl is less useful here as you're more likely to be hooked, and with a short hurl you can keep the ball closer to the body, giving better protection and control. The game is a lot more attritional these days too. If you watch old games players kept to their areas a lot more and seemed to have a lot more space on the ball. The only players who covered a lot of ground were midfielders. These days you never have as much time on the ball, as the levels of speed and fitness in players all over the park mean closing down and hassling the opposition have become more important. A smaller, more more manoeuvrable hurl helps in these situations to get the ball away quicker.

CastleBravo (Meath) - 16/12/2016 18:33:39    1940594

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You'd think an inch isn't much but if you hold a hurley which is either an inch longer or shorter than what you're used to it can feel very different

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 16/12/2016 19:17:24    1940597

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Replying To puck_da_sliotar:  "Do modern players seem to be using shorter hurleys then ever before. In an interview before the All Ireland I see that Bubbles O'Dwyer uses a 33 inch stick. is this now the norm?"
Yes a short stick is the norm with younger players longer hurls usually for keepers. To easy to get hooked, if you look at pictures of even the 90's you see players with Shovels.

arock (Dublin) - 16/12/2016 19:45:09    1940598

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The other big change is the size of the bas, they're gone huge in comparison to 10/15 years ago

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 16/12/2016 22:09:40    1940619

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I always thought hip height was the way to go but each to their own. The hurley my Da used was more like a hockey stick but he insisted it sorted out the men from the boys skill wise :D

realdub (Dublin) - 16/12/2016 22:23:42    1940623

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Used to be measure up to the hip, now it's hand down by side and Hurley up to wrist bone

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 16/12/2016 23:03:29    1940627

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we were told by a renowned hurler a few years back after he observed our u14s getting of the bus carrying long hurls that they had been told by club players etc { you'll grow into them } or a long hurl can be any length you want it to be, his first comments after introductions was your hurls are too long lads and then proceeded to demonstrate the problems long hurls cause young lads/ lasses with snagging the ground, then he told them that the hurl butt should reach no longer than your wrist when standing up straight allowing a full swing at the sliotar on the ground without stooping. Now this coming from an AI winner till a pile of culchies from a limited hurling county was quite a revelation and when we got home some of the usual suspects questioned what the hell would he know { some people really can't take positive criticism and believe they are always right} have to say since, it brought our players on immensely and probably the longest hurls now used are 34s with an odd 35/36 with the bulk of the hurls coming up from kk now 32s / 33s. Then again it is what the player is comfortable with in his hands. Nollaig Shona happy Christmas y'all and a healthy prosperous and successful new year no matter what your county or code.

bulmccabe (Tyrone) - 16/12/2016 23:26:14    1940629

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Replying To realdub:  "I always thought hip height was the way to go but each to their own. The hurley my Da used was more like a hockey stick but he insisted it sorted out the men from the boys skill wise :D"
Yeah I have an old hurl from the 80s and a new one and they look like they should be used for different sports. Bands are no longer used as much. This originated in Wexford I think? I remember as a young lad that if your hurl had no band it would be called a camogie stick And there are hurls used in Cork which have a very large bas and rounded heel.

Jack_Sparrow (Westmeath) - 16/12/2016 23:28:43    1940630

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Replying To Jack_Sparrow:  "Yeah I have an old hurl from the 80s and a new one and they look like they should be used for different sports. Bands are no longer used as much. This originated in Wexford I think? I remember as a young lad that if your hurl had no band it would be called a camogie stick And there are hurls used in Cork which have a very large bas and rounded heel."
I see that a couple of the Tipp hurley makers offer sticks in half inch intervals which is being ultra specific! Had never seen that before Even though I recall when reading Brendan Cummins book that he mentioned having a Hurley for puck outs which was half an inch longer than his regular sticks and this gave extra distance

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 17/12/2016 13:07:21    1940653

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Children need short light hurleys Parents will buy hurleys bigger, like shoes or clothes so they can grow into the stick A bit of information for parents and coaches in a club goes a long way

valley84 (Westmeath) - 17/12/2016 13:48:46    1940657

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Lads playing at the highest level do sometimes ask for custom made hurleys not just the goal keepers, the stick length is often a personal thing to suit the height and arm length of the user. A left handed player might ask for a chamfer to be put on the opposite side of the bas for side line cuts, or for a raised or shallow chamfer, raised chamfer for ball height after the cut, and shallow for distance, the stop hook at the stick end may depend on his hand size, a bit like golfers I suppose.

Scallioneater (Carlow) - 17/12/2016 15:07:55    1940666

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Mine's about 12 inches. That is what this thread is about isn't it?

uibhfhaili1986 (Offaly) - 17/12/2016 18:24:43    1940686

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What is a chamfer? Have never heard that term before

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 17/12/2016 19:22:11    1940695

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Are you doing a thesis on this or something ?

Jack_Sparrow (Westmeath) - 17/12/2016 20:11:03    1940696

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Replying To Jack_Sparrow:  "Are you doing a thesis on this or something ?"
It's a possibility alright yes

puck_da_sliotar (Cork) - 17/12/2016 21:14:05    1940710

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Hi. Its important to get players to strike if possible within their own body space - an arms length away from your body. This prevents players getting hooked. A shorter hurl and a better technique are needed. Most lads strike from their shoulder now with a wristy (Cyril eat your heart out!) Stroke. Shorter hurls are the way to go alright.

old yellar (None) - 17/12/2016 22:51:14    1940728

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