National Forum

UNESCO Hurling And Camogie

(Oldest Posts First)

Great to see International recognition of a unique part of our cultural heritage. It is as precious as the language, the big challenge is surely to prevent it going that way. Long may it continue

arock (Dublin) - Posts: 3869 - 29/11/2018 11:48:49    2152814

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Replying To arock:  "Great to see International recognition of a unique part of our cultural heritage. It is as precious as the language, the big challenge is surely to prevent it going that way. Long may it continue"
While any recognition of any aspect of Ireland's unique cultural heritage is welcome, especially in this era of mass globalisation/conglomeration surely (to echo the president of the Association's declaration on the 50th anniversary of the GAA in 1934) the first priority for hurling should be to make it a real 32 county game!

TheHermit (Kerry) - Posts: 4063 - 29/11/2018 12:09:10    2152817

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Replying To TheHermit:  "While any recognition of any aspect of Ireland's unique cultural heritage is welcome, especially in this era of mass globalisation/conglomeration surely (to echo the president of the Association's declaration on the 50th anniversary of the GAA in 1934) the first priority for hurling should be to make it a real 32 county game!"
100% agreed. I'm all for pushing the game abroad but we need to focus closer to home first.

Now for my controversial comment........... how in the hell is camogie deemed to be an intrinsic part of our culture??? It just isn't! The crowds are poor, the game itself is a poor copy of hurling and generally it has a very small following and it is awful to watch.

I'll probably be attacked for being sexist but I am not. I love ladies football as I think they have adapted the game/rules to make the game better (the mens game could learn a lot). Camogie have done the opposite. Any camogie player you ask would say the rules are ridiculous.

Mayonman (Galway) - Posts: 762 - 29/11/2018 13:01:29    2152826

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Replying To Mayonman:  "100% agreed. I'm all for pushing the game abroad but we need to focus closer to home first.

Now for my controversial comment........... how in the hell is camogie deemed to be an intrinsic part of our culture??? It just isn't! The crowds are poor, the game itself is a poor copy of hurling and generally it has a very small following and it is awful to watch.

I'll probably be attacked for being sexist but I am not. I love ladies football as I think they have adapted the game/rules to make the game better (the mens game could learn a lot). Camogie have done the opposite. Any camogie player you ask would say the rules are ridiculous."
Well Camogie is far from perfect, BUT it is one of the oldest female team sports in the world. I don't need to remind you they were BANNED for decades from playing in public parks, reviled by the Catholic church even in the 60's. So you not being sexist, the reason why crowds are small, why the girls are treated with contempt in most part is not down to the girls it is down to men;'s attitude to women in the most part. If you only see what you don't like you certainly won't see what is so special about. Irish women were playing camogie before they got the vote, before they fought for Ireland, they are part and parcel of our heritage. It would be very dangerous to insult 50% of the population they deserve some respect.

arock (Dublin) - Posts: 3869 - 29/11/2018 14:43:30    2152830

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Replying To Mayonman:  "100% agreed. I'm all for pushing the game abroad but we need to focus closer to home first.

Now for my controversial comment........... how in the hell is camogie deemed to be an intrinsic part of our culture??? It just isn't! The crowds are poor, the game itself is a poor copy of hurling and generally it has a very small following and it is awful to watch.

I'll probably be attacked for being sexist but I am not. I love ladies football as I think they have adapted the game/rules to make the game better (the mens game could learn a lot). Camogie have done the opposite. Any camogie player you ask would say the rules are ridiculous."
I am not sure what rules are ridiculous in camogie, Camogie rules are technically similarly modified to Ladies Gaelic football. Neither game allows the shoulder charge, Ladies football allows a two handed pickup off the ground, in camogie there is a 45 instead of a 65 and both codes (including here men's football) allow a hand struck goal. Everything else is more or less the same, being coaching hurling and camogie for 20 odd years and I wouldn't say the rules were ridiculous.

arock (Dublin) - Posts: 3869 - 29/11/2018 15:25:19    2152833

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Replying To arock:  "Well Camogie is far from perfect, BUT it is one of the oldest female team sports in the world. I don't need to remind you they were BANNED for decades from playing in public parks, reviled by the Catholic church even in the 60's. So you not being sexist, the reason why crowds are small, why the girls are treated with contempt in most part is not down to the girls it is down to men;'s attitude to women in the most part. If you only see what you don't like you certainly won't see what is so special about. Irish women were playing camogie before they got the vote, before they fought for Ireland, they are part and parcel of our heritage. It would be very dangerous to insult 50% of the population they deserve some respect."
See there's the problem straight away. I didn't insult 50% of the population. If I said i didn't like mens tennis (I hate mens tennis too much big serve game over, no rallies) would I be insulting all men? I said I don't like camogie as a sport........how is that insulting 50% of the population. That is a silly thing to say. If camogie had the same rules as hurling and I said something similar I would basically be saying I like the sport when men play it but not when women play it. But it doesn't. It has different rules that make it terrible to watch. That is not sexist and I believe a few top camogie players made similar comments after this years championship.

Now as for the rest of your argument, I didn't know that and find it interesting. I accept your points as being a legitimate argument. I was not aware of the history.............. are we friends again????

Mayonman (Galway) - Posts: 762 - 29/11/2018 15:28:09    2152834

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Apparently it is played in all parts of Ireland (snigger)

StoreysTash (Wexford) - Posts: 187 - 29/11/2018 16:21:05    2152840

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Replying To Mayonman:  "100% agreed. I'm all for pushing the game abroad but we need to focus closer to home first.

Now for my controversial comment........... how in the hell is camogie deemed to be an intrinsic part of our culture??? It just isn't! The crowds are poor, the game itself is a poor copy of hurling and generally it has a very small following and it is awful to watch.

I'll probably be attacked for being sexist but I am not. I love ladies football as I think they have adapted the game/rules to make the game better (the mens game could learn a lot). Camogie have done the opposite. Any camogie player you ask would say the rules are ridiculous."
I think in this instance, its the same root sport thats being referred to by 2 names. I don't think Unesco are considering these 2 sports, just the same cultural artifact, and its 2 derivatives.

Marlon_JD (Tipperary) - Posts: 1694 - 29/11/2018 16:49:31    2152842

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Hurling has been played here for 1000 years or so. Well a stick and ball game that we called hurling has been played here a thousand years ago. Looking at hurling sticks from a century ago, they look remarkably like hockey or shinty sticks. Even old video footage from say Christy Ring era shows the game is more like modern hockey or shinty than modern hurling. A lot of GAA folk are fascinated by how hurling is perceived abroad and no doubt they will be chuffed by this farcical recognition. In the ground in over half the counties of the country, nobody is bothered to play or attend a game.

bennybunny (Cork) - Posts: 3657 - 29/11/2018 18:17:19    2152850

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Replying To Mayonman:  "See there's the problem straight away. I didn't insult 50% of the population. If I said i didn't like mens tennis (I hate mens tennis too much big serve game over, no rallies) would I be insulting all men? I said I don't like camogie as a sport........how is that insulting 50% of the population. That is a silly thing to say. If camogie had the same rules as hurling and I said something similar I would basically be saying I like the sport when men play it but not when women play it. But it doesn't. It has different rules that make it terrible to watch. That is not sexist and I believe a few top camogie players made similar comments after this years championship.

Now as for the rest of your argument, I didn't know that and find it interesting. I accept your points as being a legitimate argument. I was not aware of the history.............. are we friends again????"
We were never enemies, people are entitled to their opinion and to speak them and I accept stating 50% was wrong and you never meant to insult anyone.

arock (Dublin) - Posts: 3869 - 29/11/2018 18:23:30    2152851

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Replying To StoreysTash:  "Apparently it is played in all parts of Ireland (snigger)"
Where in Ireland would be the furthest from a hurling pitch? Southwest Donegal maybe? Anyone got any suggestions?

Soma (UK) - Posts: 2232 - 29/11/2018 21:59:47    2152866

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Did someone just assume this sports gender :D

realdub (Dublin) - Posts: 7060 - 30/11/2018 00:23:00    2152873

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I really think UNESCO need to start with building underage structures and they maybe looking at competing in the adult/intermediate championship before they go on talking about winning senior titles.

The_DOC (Galway) - Posts: 508 - 30/11/2018 08:59:27    2152882

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