National Forum

Hurling Is On Its Knees

(Oldest Posts First)

https://www.balls.ie/gaa/martin-fogarty-394513

Interesting interview with Martin Fogarty. I like his line that you don't need to have played hurling to be a good hurling coach. Not playing the game seems to be a deterrent of some would be coaches.

Killarney.87 (Tipperary) - Posts: 2245 - 10/08/2018 13:13:42    2131521

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Replying To Killarney.87:  "https://www.balls.ie/gaa/martin-fogarty-394513

Interesting interview with Martin Fogarty. I like his line that you don't need to have played hurling to be a good hurling coach. Not playing the game seems to be a deterrent of some would be coaches."
How come this was never brought up when Kilkenny were winning All Irelands???

Oldtourman (Limerick) - Posts: 1574 - 11/08/2018 08:36:23    2131668

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Replying To Oldtourman:  "How come this was never brought up when Kilkenny were winning All Irelands???"
Better later than never I suppose. Paudi Butler was very good in this role before Fogarty. He held coaching courses the length and breadth of Ireland.

If the young fellas have some senior club team to progress to them they hit a Cul de Sac. I like the idea of clubs from counties where hurling is weak having a multi-county club league competition.

I hope some folks who never played hurling in those counties will be more encouraged to become a hurling coach in their native county after reading the article.

Killarney.87 (Tipperary) - Posts: 2245 - 11/08/2018 15:15:14    2131762

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Completely disagree with GAA putting coaches into schools as a strategy to promote the games -, that is as the primary strategy . Completely disagree with his statement that a paid person can't form a club. If he feels that way, he should be removed from his post.

Kids leave primary school at 11 or 12. No point in throwing all of your resources into primary school coaching, get the kids hooked, and then they having no where to go.

Full time coaches should be attached to clubs first and foremost with a link to schools. They can work Wednesday to Sunday or whatever. If they time mid week they can mess about in schools but Saturday and Sunday down in the club organising coaching for players and mentors.. Building structures that provide continuity is key. Forming clubs is what they should be doing. Not taking the lazy option.

If he thinks that these coaches cannot start or form a new club, then he is not fit for the role. I have been reading interviews like his since early 1990s. They have made zero progress. Listening to the Meath coach, they have gone backwards. The man either needs to get a grip or get out of dodge.

bennybunny (Cork) - Posts: 3624 - 11/08/2018 19:17:34    2131869

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If hurling is on its knees Football by comparison is buried 6 feet into the ground

37thHeaven (Kerry) - Posts: 102 - 11/08/2018 21:41:48    2131964

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Replying To Killarney.87:  "https://www.balls.ie/gaa/martin-fogarty-394513

Interesting interview with Martin Fogarty. I like his line that you don't need to have played hurling to be a good hurling coach. Not playing the game seems to be a deterrent of some would be coaches."
Hurling is on its knees outside about 8-9 counties.
It is a real pity to think that only half the counties in Ireland even put an honest effort into the game.
Imagine there is a Henry Shefflin or Joe Canning in Leitrim or Tyrone who never got a hurl in his hand.

Do people from football counties think that if massive money was pumped into hurling in the county, that it would be completely squandered? Or is there any way it could be guaranteed to be spent properly and hurling focused?

For me, the biggest tragedy of all is in Offaly, Laois and Antrim. These are 3 proud hurling counties and the game is dying there. I've heard Offaly people blame county boards, etc - but county boards are made up of clubs, so it is not a fair excuse.

Its a pity that as we head towards 150 years of GAA, hurling hasn't reached so many parts of this island.

StoreysTash (Wexford) - Posts: 36 - 17/08/2018 10:27:28    2134003

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