National - GAA injuries now like road collisions

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Is it time for the GAA to protect players?

bad.monkey (USA) - Posts:4343 - 17/02/2017 12:22:55   1957709

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I would be interested to see the reports of this. I think that refereeing has improved the safety of players but the conditioning of players is an issue here for sure. Unfortunately, I think all players have to have their own insurance as far as I know.

Donegalman (All) - Posts:2976 - 17/02/2017 13:42:41   1957734

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Interesting article. It's happening across most contact sports I suppose as players get bigger, faster, stronger.

What can be done?

I know in rugby they've certain protocols as regards concussion, I'm not sure how great or successful they are though. As the article states though it isn't always about concussion as some hits can result in bodily damage. You'd imagine they are facing similar issues too, what's done there to protect the players and is it an option for the GAA?

At top level there could be independent doctors present but can you imagine the crying on here of, par example, Diarmuid Connolly shipped a heavy hit and was not allowed to return to the field in a big game, and Dublin went on to lose by a point!

Players safety should be paramount always.

MesAmis (Dublin) - Posts:10857 - 17/02/2017 13:42:59   1957735

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Replying To bad.monkey:  "link

Is it time for the GAA to protect players?"
The haadline of the thread is somewhat misleading. A doctor has just been on the RTE lunchtime news and he said that a very small minority of GAA injuries are like road collisions.As regards protecting players he said that all players suspected of having concussion should be removed from the field immediately and not be allowed to return as even if a player seems to be okay he may not be.

lilywhite1 (Kildare) - Posts:2651 - 17/02/2017 13:54:43   1957736

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Yes i think for any suspected concussions players need to be removed. The decision should not ever be left in hands of the player. At top level by team doctor and at club level managers need to do the correct thing by the player and put their health first.

bad.monkey (USA) - Posts:4343 - 17/02/2017 14:35:16   1957740

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Replying To Donegalman:  "I would be interested to see the reports of this. I think that refereeing has improved the safety of players but the conditioning of players is an issue here for sure. Unfortunately, I think all players have to have their own insurance as far as I know."
Where did you hear that???

As far as I'm aware, once a player is a paid up member with their club the club covers the cost of any injury.

No idea how it works with intercounty.

cavanman47 (Cavan) - Posts:2564 - 17/02/2017 15:05:34   1957745

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Replying To cavanman47:  "Where did you hear that???

As far as I'm aware, once a player is a paid up member with their club the club covers the cost of any injury.

No idea how it works with intercounty."
Correct cavanman47, the the club players insurance scheme covers players once they are paid up members. However I think that there is an upper limit to the coverage. So players are advised to have additional cover themselves.
I believe that the injury schemes no longer covers visits to the club appointed Physio. The players must fund this themselves partly with the club either partly subsidising or fully in some cases.

lilywhite1 (Kildare) - Posts:2651 - 17/02/2017 15:54:43   1957756

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Replying To lilywhite1:  "Correct cavanman47, the the club players insurance scheme covers players once they are paid up members. However I think that there is an upper limit to the coverage. So players are advised to have additional cover themselves.
I believe that the injury schemes no longer covers visits to the club appointed Physio. The players must fund this themselves partly with the club either partly subsidising or fully in some cases."
It's been a while since I played. When did this come into effect?

Donegalman (All) - Posts:2976 - 17/02/2017 17:07:12   1957770

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Maybe some of 7m + given to the GPA could be diverted to ensure all club players are fully insured . A few less award dinners would cover it

bad.monkey (USA) - Posts:4343 - 17/02/2017 17:14:41   1957773

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Replying To bad.monkey:  "link

Is it time for the GAA to protect players?"
Didn't shay given suffer an injury an injury on the pitch about 10 years ago that was similar to the injuries suffered by car accident injuries.

gotmilk (Fermanagh) - Posts:4298 - 17/02/2017 18:10:28   1957786

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Replying To Donegalman:  "It's been a while since I played. When did this come into effect?"
Hi Donegalman, I found this online in relation to the players injury Scheme.

GAA Players Injury Scheme

Please find a copy of the current claim form and policy brochure.

Important points to note in relation to the scheme include:

Willis must receive at least the first 2 pages of the claim form into their offices within 60 days of the date of injury. Otherwise the claim will be automatically declined. Claim forms can be posted, emailed or faxed.


The excess on the Scheme is €100.


The maximum amount claimable for medical expenses is €4,500.


A referees report is required if the injury occurred during an official or challenge match.


A club letter is required if the injury occurred during club/county training.


There is no cover for pre-operative physiotherapy. The only physiotherapy expenses that may be claimed are for treatments that are post-operative i.e. after a surgical procedure. They are then limited to €320 in total maxed at €40 for any one treatment. (8 treatments at €40 each). A doctors letter will be required referring the claimant for physiotherapy treatments.


MRI scans can be claimed maxed at €300 per scan. However there are a number of medical centres offering MRI's for below this price. You do not require a doctor to refer you for an MRI, for the purposes of the Scheme.


If the claimant has private health insurance (VHI, Quinn, Aviva etc) then they must claim from them first. The GAA Scheme is NOT an insurance scheme. It is a benefit scheme for the purpose of giving an injured player a "dig out" if they have no other recourse for their medical expenses. Payments from the Scheme come directly from GAA funds, there is no insurer involved with the Scheme. Willis act as claims assessors and administrators ONLY.


Any treatment being claimed must have been paid prior to claiming with the Scheme. This does not mean that you must wait for your treatment to be completed before submitting a claim. It means the Scheme will only assess receipts and not invoices or unpaid bills.


Loss of wages can be claimed for up to 52 weeks provided the claimant is declared medically unfit to work by doctor/consultant or surgeon. The claimant must be in full-time employment (16 hours or more per week).


The excess for a loss of wages claim is the first week.


Payment is calculated by taking the claimants average weekly net wage minus social welfare payment (illness benefit which the claimant must make a claim for and provide written evidence from his local social welfare office stating how much he is receiving or why he is not entitled to receive any payment) or sick pay entitlements from his employer etc.


The Scheme then follows the below limits on the remainder:


Week 1 - excess (no payment)
Week 2 - 4 up to € 200
Week 5- 52 up to € 400


There is scope in the Scheme to claim if the claimant has suffered a Permanent total or partial disability (loss of finger etc). However each case is taken on its own merits and the medical information is assessed by an independent medical advisor. The decision is made directly by CLG and they will agree the relevant claim figure.


A claimant can claim for a stay in hospital provided they are an in-patient for a minimum of 10 consecutive days and they can claim for a maximum of 15 days. € 400 per day is claimable. This is separate to any hospital charges as these can be claimed under medical expenses.

lilywhite1 (Kildare) - Posts:2651 - 17/02/2017 18:44:12   1957797

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Replying To MesAmis:  "Interesting article. It's happening across most contact sports I suppose as players get bigger, faster, stronger.

What can be done?

I know in rugby they've certain protocols as regards concussion, I'm not sure how great or successful they are though. As the article states though it isn't always about concussion as some hits can result in bodily damage. You'd imagine they are facing similar issues too, what's done there to protect the players and is it an option for the GAA?

At top level there could be independent doctors present but can you imagine the crying on here of, par example, Diarmuid Connolly shipped a heavy hit and was not allowed to return to the field in a big game, and Dublin went on to lose by a point!

Players safety should be paramount always."
I think the main concern for the GAA (apart from clash of accidental clash of heads) is the whiplash type injuries. The effect of shoulder charge on an opponent not braced for it is potentially as bad as concussion. This is fairly well documented in NFL circles and it is also well documented the effects on the brain of whiplash type injury due to impact at speed. I mean in GAA the charge must be shoulder to shoulder but I can see this been phased out. A mistimed charge to the chest could have catastrophic effect on a player. That said it is quite remarkable how few injuries there are given the fitness, strenght and conditioning etc

arock (Dublin) - Posts:3344 - 17/02/2017 19:21:02   1957809

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It is a long time since I played Gaelic. I never thought it was too physical vis Rugby or Soccer for example. Anything that helps player welfare is worth highlighting. That said the anti GAA media is making a bit of a meal of this in my opinion.

galwayford (Galway) - Posts:975 - 18/02/2017 10:42:46   1957882

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