National Forum

Does Hurling Need A Mark?

(Oldest Posts First)

Aerial catching is without doubt one of hurling's finest arts.
Having seen Jack O'Connor make some spectacular catches for Wexford, only to be completely bottled up when he came down from the sky.
It got me thinking, should hurling have a mark?
How I would say it could work.
1. Player catches ball, can keep playing on or can call mark.
2. Can't score direct from the mark, the ball is too light for this to be allowed.
3. Only allow from puck-outs crossing the 65?

Posting as a discussion point. Have not thought through fully!

Pinkie (Wexford) - Posts: 4100 - 06/03/2018 11:13:40    2082151

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It would just be another rule for the hurling referees not to enforce so don't think it is required. In football games I have seen I would say 3/4+ of the time the player plays on but even in the football the referees seem to have different interpretations of it as few seem to enforce the time limit on the player taking the mark releasing the ball or the distance away opposition has to be, or if the player plays on the rule on the steps/time on the ball before the opposition can tackle is often overlooked. In most cases if they play on they are surrounded pretty much straight away or likewise if they take the mark the opposition slow the play down by either not retreating or moving slowly away from the player who has the mark yet remain unpunished.

It is like a lot of these rule changes being brought in - in theory they sound good and have the potential to be good for the game but unfortunately in reality they are implemented poorly and just add further confusion and/or frustration.

Offside_Rule (Antrim) - Posts: 3692 - 06/03/2018 11:41:35    2082156

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Replying To Pinkie:  "Aerial catching is without doubt one of hurling's finest arts.
Having seen Jack O'Connor make some spectacular catches for Wexford, only to be completely bottled up when he came down from the sky.
It got me thinking, should hurling have a mark?
How I would say it could work.
1. Player catches ball, can keep playing on or can call mark.
2. Can't score direct from the mark, the ball is too light for this to be allowed.
3. Only allow from puck-outs crossing the 65?

Posting as a discussion point. Have not thought through fully!"
Worth looking at the 'Free Puck' rule as seen in the Super 11's: 'Where a foul is committed a free puck or penalty puck shall be awarded to the opposing team. If a player from the team which commits the foul is in possession of the ball he shall immediately release the ball. Free pucks shall be taken from the point at which the free puck is awarded by a player from the team awarded the free puck playing the ball in any permitted manner. All players on the opposing team must immediately retreat 5 yards and cannot impede the taker of the free puck until he has taken 4 steps or the referee calls play on.'

PortInFaithful (Offaly) - Posts: 394 - 06/03/2018 11:42:12    2082158

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No I don't think it does. Defenders have to be allowed to defend

Onfor15 (Wexford) - Posts: 92 - 06/03/2018 12:04:57    2082165

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Ah sure they can flake someone with their hurley or elbow, then take 8 or 10 steps, throw the sliotar in the direction of their hurl, rise it, and away they go, in loads of space.

m_the_d (None) - Posts: 1035 - 06/03/2018 12:13:10    2082167

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No for me. It would create an artificial part of the game. Where teams would be lobbing the ball into the square. It'd be kinda like winning a corner in soccer.

Football has one and I'm still unsure over it. I think the high catch in football is wonderful but the mark dilutes the skill for me because as soon as the player is about to win it the opposition are already retreating back so the move loses it's dynamic nature a little as there is no contest as soon as the ball is in the hands.

MesAmis (Dublin) - Posts: 12105 - 06/03/2018 12:20:43    2082170

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would be worth trying,it is hardly a tough one to referee.a catch is made,yay or nay.
just like aussie rules,the player can keep going if he wants,it doesn't have to stop the game.

perfect10 (Wexford) - Posts: 3034 - 06/03/2018 12:54:38    2082182

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No it will slow down the game, the reason the mark was introduced in football was because when a player jumps up and catches a high ball by the time he lands on the ground he is surrounded by opponents and unable to release the ball and therefore the ref blows up for a foul for over carrying, the mark is a way to strengthen the player catching high balls and to award him for doing so. All that will happen in hurling is it will slow down the play, allow defenders to get back into position or allow the marker to strike for a point, leave hurling as it is

riverboys (Mayo) - Posts: 1295 - 06/03/2018 13:15:02    2082185

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Replying To riverboys:  "No it will slow down the game, the reason the mark was introduced in football was because when a player jumps up and catches a high ball by the time he lands on the ground he is surrounded by opponents and unable to release the ball and therefore the ref blows up for a foul for over carrying, the mark is a way to strengthen the player catching high balls and to award him for doing so. All that will happen in hurling is it will slow down the play, allow defenders to get back into position or allow the marker to strike for a point, leave hurling as it is"
you need to watch more hurling,plenty of players catch a ball and get bottled up and cough up possession or a free blown against them for overcarrying.
i think you are missing his point above,if a player wants to run off with the ball there is nothing stopping him.

perfect10 (Wexford) - Posts: 3034 - 06/03/2018 14:21:47    2082212

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As the auld man used to say, this is hurling, a stick game, if your willing to put your hand up to catch the ball you better be willing to have your fingers broken. Ahhh the oldschool, you can't beat them. :D

realdub (Dublin) - Posts: 7060 - 06/03/2018 16:24:43    2082246

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