National Forum

New Referee Advice

(Oldest Posts First) - Go To The Latest Post


1. Only officiate on what you see.
2. Speak to players, emplain your decision( not justify)
3. Always bring at least 2 umpires(it could save you alot of hassle)
4. Be fair and consistent.
5. Spare pencils in your socks.
6. Two watches. I use a spintso one(about 100€).
7.ENJOY IT.

reffingmad (Roscommon) - Posts: 165 - 28/02/2018 20:06:43    2081333

Link

Make sure you have a good team that you trust around you, watchful linesmen and umpires who aren't afraid to make hard calls are worth everything, poor linesmen and umpires will ruin you and your name, stick to the rule book, never mind letting the game flow, if you are soft on decisions players will cop on and start acting up pushing the boundaries, don't be afraid to make the big calls, always have a good relationship with your linesmen and umpires , ask for their views/ opinions, enjoy it, hopefully you will go far and maybe you'll end up in Croke Park someday. Good luck

riverboys (Mayo) - Posts: 1295 - 28/02/2018 22:31:12    2081350

Link

In my experience young lads glorify yellow cards. Its like the premier league or something. Explain why you are penalising them. If a chap of 12 or 13 steps to far over the line have him subbed.
daytona11 (Kildare) - Posts: 3552 - 28/02/2018 16:29:34
Yes i agree you can sub a 12/13 year old if going too far but i dont feel young players glorify yellow cards.
Look you'll be ok. As i said implement the rule book and use the advantage rule to good effect.
Just dont end up like a rugby ref afraid to make an actual decision or Nigel Owens who never shuts up.
If you are not noticed during a game its a good thing.
daytona11 (Kildare) - Posts: 3552 - 28/02/2018 16:32:05
rugby referees are far better at making decisions/dealing with players/gaining respect from players than those in other sports. GAA either referees or spectators/coaches/players are in no place to criticise rugby for its dealings with officials. Rugby is miles ahead of GAA in this regard.
First foul = a yellow card.
Lay down a marker from the off.
if_in_doubt (Kildare) - Posts: 3514 - 28/02/2018 16:55:28
It doesnt. If the foul isnt in any way related to a yellow card then it negatively affects a referee as it gives a perception of something that isnt true of a referee to players/coaches and spectators
fox whistle best in the business, 2 stopwatches, spare pencils in case you lose one during the game, also use pencil as it is easier to see on a wet day plus a pen could let you down other than that do a fair job and enjoy it
mrsme (USA) - Posts: 77 - 28/02/2018 19:30:21
very much personal preference but many refs i know in multiple sports swear by acme thunderers as whistle. totally agree on pencil over pen.

ormondbannerman (Clare) - Posts: 13473 - 28/02/2018 23:00:37    2081360

Link

Fox 40 classic whistle . Has to be classic the pearl or other have wrong sound . Only the fox 40 is loud enough especially over crowd noise when u get up in the ranks . Also it's pealess so no problems in wet weather.
Sprint so watch a must u will only need one and it will cover your time your stoppages your halftime break all in one. It also vibrates Remind u to turn back on on restarts after stoppages. Which is big mistake made when u start out.
There is a referee handbook out there now that your ref admin in your county can get you which will cover training and warm up sessions for you . Also cover lot of other instances for you too . It's a must have for all refs .

Learn the rules know them ,they are your friend . Apply those rules and over time with experience you will be able to let game flow little easier as you develop your game . Get the game changing decisions right i.e. Cards penalties any thing leading to scores. You can be forgiven for missing an odd technical free but get the key game decisions Correct not many will have an issue with you.

Never be afraid to ask questions learn from your mistakes starlight away and seek out the experienced guys in your county and as them the same questions.
Best of luck with it.

urhavinalaugh (Carlow) - Posts: 72 - 28/02/2018 23:50:27    2081363

Link

Replying To urhavinalaugh:  "Fox 40 classic whistle . Has to be classic the pearl or other have wrong sound . Only the fox 40 is loud enough especially over crowd noise when u get up in the ranks . Also it's pealess so no problems in wet weather.
Sprint so watch a must u will only need one and it will cover your time your stoppages your halftime break all in one. It also vibrates Remind u to turn back on on restarts after stoppages. Which is big mistake made when u start out.
There is a referee handbook out there now that your ref admin in your county can get you which will cover training and warm up sessions for you . Also cover lot of other instances for you too . It's a must have for all refs .

Learn the rules know them ,they are your friend . Apply those rules and over time with experience you will be able to let game flow little easier as you develop your game . Get the game changing decisions right i.e. Cards penalties any thing leading to scores. You can be forgiven for missing an odd technical free but get the key game decisions Correct not many will have an issue with you.

Never be afraid to ask questions learn from your mistakes starlight away and seek out the experienced guys in your county and as them the same questions.
Best of luck with it."
Thanks for advice. Are those sprint so watches available in Ireland?

leftandwide (Meath) - Posts: 91 - 01/03/2018 12:55:49    2081421

Link

best wishes. Refereeing 20+ years, brilliant experiences, lot of good advice offered already on forum. Learning the rules is obvious but crucial. Talk to the players too

Bellewest (Westmeath) - Posts: 36 - 01/03/2018 13:59:05    2081434

Link

Plenty of good advice above. The only piece of advice I would add is not to let player(s) or the crowd influence your decision making and be careful about 'letting the game flow' until you become totally confident in your ability to handle anything that might arise. Good luck and enjoy the experience.

neverright (Roscommon) - Posts: 1400 - 01/03/2018 14:23:25    2081438

Link

Replying To leftandwide:  "Thanks for advice. Are those sprint so watches available in Ireland?"
they are available online. google sprintso referee watch Ireland.

reffingmad (Roscommon) - Posts: 165 - 01/03/2018 16:18:24    2081460

Link

Great thread this. Can't tell you anything based on any of my experience within the GAA, because I have none (unless Scór na nÓg counts). All you're getting from me is based on games I've attended and anything I've picked up over the years of watching and reading about sport.

Be consistent in your decisions. Don't be afraid to follow the rule book although it might be unpopular or the rule might be obscure*, but leave room for common sense too. There's a balance there somewhere that you must find.

Explain your decisions; surely nothing frustrates players more than when the ref awards a free against them and they're completely in the dark why. In this way, have respect for the players, and they will have respect for you.

Don't let players intimidate you; don't tolerate any attempts to make you change a decision. Take no crap from them. You have your cards; I'm not sure if the GAA rule book allows refs to book players in these circumstances (although Rule 6.1 looks good).

KNOW THE RULEBOOK; it's in black and white, it's objective, and players and managers can't argue against it.

Best of luck with it!!!

*e.g. if you have the ball and you go to ground, you can score a goal by fisting the ball. Football Rule 3.1 exception (ii).

Tacaí Liatroma (Leitrim) - Posts: 482 - 01/03/2018 21:32:44    2081522

Link

The sprintso watch is over 100 quid? No need to get something that expensive when just starting out. I got 2 watches for 60 euro 5 year ago. Just basic wrist stop watches. They all do the same thing.

daytona11 (Kildare) - Posts: 3582 - 02/03/2018 09:54:44    2081538

Link

Keep communicating with the players. If there's a break in play (a wide or injury) announce the score and the time elapsed. Don't give smart arse one liners to queries. You're being paid to ref not doing stand up. Anyone swears to you, take the ball up.

FootblockREF (Monaghan) - Posts: 251 - 02/03/2018 10:57:25    2081547

Link

Fair play to you.

My only advice is to seek a mentor. There's a world or knowledge and experience out there. I'm sure you will learn allot from their experience.

Good luck

Ban (Westmeath) - Posts: 929 - 02/03/2018 11:22:35    2081552

Link

Although Pierluigi Collina is a retired soccer referee, and at a totally different level to most referees of any sport anywhere, he had to start off somewhere too, and his book The Rules of the Game has good anecdotes and bits of information and advice based on his extensive experience. It's somewhat autobiographical as well and not awfully long. There's a good one in there about how he had to disallow a goal for offside in a rabid Serie A game (Juve vs Milan I think) even though the linesman didn't flag it, and how he dealt with it. (The one where his borrowed car breaks down on the way to a game in the days before mobile phones is good too.)

Tacaí Liatroma (Leitrim) - Posts: 482 - 03/03/2018 14:38:19    2081700

Link

Replying To if_in_doubt:  "First foul = a yellow card.

Lay down a marker from the off."
Don't do that. It's terrible advice.

If you make a mistake, DON'T try to compensate for it later. Own it and move on.

FootblockREF (Monaghan) - Posts: 251 - 05/03/2018 16:41:08    2081973

Link

During my time as a referee I stuck to one simple philosophy - create the environment that is appropriate to the players on the field.

What I mean by this is I always decide at the first collision based on the reactions of the players how I will officiate over the game. For example, If a player gets possession and is hit hard in a borderline frontal manner or there there is a swing or swipe on a player which categorizes as potentially wild I always look to see, does the receiver hit the deck shouting for a free and his teammates get up in arms? Does the other team assume a free will be given? If yes to both of the above then I know that i'll have to referee a strict game. If not a know I can let them at each other a little more.

Don't ever stick to the rule book. It is a guideline at best.

TheFullBack (Galway) - Posts: 110 - 06/03/2018 13:54:23    2082201

Link

During my time as a referee I stuck to one simple philosophy - create the environment that is appropriate to the players on the field.

What I mean by this is I always decide at the first collision based on the reactions of the players how I will officiate over the game. For example, If a player gets possession and is hit hard in a borderline frontal manner or there there is a swing or swipe on a player which categorizes as potentially wild I always look to see, does the receiver hit the deck shouting for a free and his teammates get up in arms? Does the other team assume a free will be given? If yes to both of the above then I know that i'll have to referee a strict game. If not a know I can let them at each other a little more.

Don't ever stick to the rule book. It is a guideline at best.

TheFullBack (Galway) - Posts: 103 - 06/03/2018 13:54:23
thats a terrible philosphy to decide how to officiate the game based on reaction of first collison. doesnt help anyone

ormondbannerman (Clare) - Posts: 13473 - 06/03/2018 21:17:03    2082322

Link

Fox whistles are absolutely essential for the modern day quintessential referee. Full duck (or fox in this case) or no dinner. I've been using my fox 40 for the last thirteen and a half years and I've never been let down with them. I had an erroneous malfunction with a kipsta whistle back in 98, resulting in my deliberation and forced me to explore my options. Every referee is only as good as their whistle. The very best of luck in the job.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 06/03/2018 23:09:38    2082356

Link

Month into it now and the abuse from sideline at underage games has been a big surprise. Not saying I've been perfect ref, far from it but it's been a real eye opener. Can't be a good example for young players going forward

leftandwide (Meath) - Posts: 91 - 13/04/2018 22:52:07    2092926

Link

Replying To leftandwide:  "Month into it now and the abuse from sideline at underage games has been a big surprise. Not saying I've been perfect ref, far from it but it's been a real eye opener. Can't be a good example for young players going forward"
unfortunately that's not gonna change, some parents and coaches at underage should be ashamed of themselves, don't let it get to you and keep the head up.

reffingmad (Roscommon) - Posts: 165 - 13/04/2018 23:16:54    2092932

Link

Pack it in and do something else. Its not worth the aggravation and abuse.

Gaillimh_Abu (Galway) - Posts: 761 - 13/04/2018 23:26:21    2092935

Link