National Forum

French Football Championship 2018

(Oldest Posts First) - Go To The Latest Post


Just an after-thought there, after seeing Real Madrid make light work of PSG in the aul champions league, it's probably as well off that Paris have a strong Gaelic football team, seem to be all the city have to hold on to at the moment! Mind you I doubt Brannigan is getting the paychecks to match his soccer counter-part in Neymar!!

ImpossibleAngle (Galway) - Posts: 5 - 07/03/2018 15:38:34    2082477

Link

Replying To ImpossibleAngle:  "Just an after-thought there, after seeing Real Madrid make light work of PSG in the aul champions league, it's probably as well off that Paris have a strong Gaelic football team, seem to be all the city have to hold on to at the moment! Mind you I doubt Brannigan is getting the paychecks to match his soccer counter-part in Neymar!!"
Not that they need to further improve their panel but for the sake of the small fish in French football, we'll hope Cavani and young Mbappé don't switch codes to the Capital Gaels or the they'd run the show altogether!

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 07/03/2018 15:46:47    2082482

Link

Replying To Gleebo:  "
Replying To gerloughnane:  "[quote=Gleebo:  "It's time for change in European football. All teams are at an immediate disadvantage when majority of funding stays wihtin the capitals.

Where are you getting this idea from? My club's based in a capital city and I'd only love for us to have some of this bottomless funding that seems to be theoretically out there ;) I know of several other clubs like us where all or almost all of their budget comes from internal sources such as membership fees and fundraising.

Chances are that capital city teams are better funded as they have higher playing populations, easier access to Irish networks, greater options for sponsorship. Mind you, pitch rental etc. will probably also be more costly for them."
Your not getting my point @Gleebo, yes facilities are more expensive to rent and a wider spread of players etc but can't dodge the matter because be it due to funding pro rata per player or otherwise, across the Continent particularly the smaller nations the Capitals are dominating. I too am part of a Capital and without competition the smaller cities are losing hope and motivation if they can't compete. Something must be done to create competitive Championships abroad and unfortuantely like all else in the world, it's down to money."
Well, I guess we're going to have to agree to disagree, then.

GGE gets €8 per player registered every year to fund all of its activities, be it coaching sessions, referee training sessions, organizing tournaments, the yearly convention, sending representative teams to the World Games, club set-up grants etc. That is not a lot of bread to redistribute across 100 clubs in the way you seem to be suggesting.

To put it in context: friends of mine who played for Europe in the World Games two years back had to crowdfund to meet their costs, while fellas from regions like the Middle East, Australia etc. were subsidised by their county boards (and rightfully so, given the travelling etc. involved). It's no-one's fault, it's just that Europe is so integrated that it's much more difficult to get business sponsors on board than somewhere that's relatively untapped for Irish business. The Pan-Asian Games, for example, are sponsored by Fexco, Middle East GAA is sponsored by Etihad. The Pan-Euros just got their first sponsor last year, but it's safe to say that there's a huge disparity there.

Likewise, some regions/ cities of Europe are more prosperous than others. There are sources of funding out there (that I mentioned earlier) that can be used for club development if people put their thinking caps on.

It seems to me that if things in France are as uncompetitive as you're suggesting, then it's more a question of structures changing to reflect the gaps, rather than finances alone. Benelux have championship and shield structures, for example, which is needed as there would be huge gaps in playing resources between the top clubs and some of the newer ones from smaller cities."]Lads, the Euro scene is a shocking shocking standard of football played 11 a side on old rugby pitches with terrible referees. Don't kid yourselves. You'd be much better off integrating yourself into whatever country you find yourselves in and broaden your horizons.

Only thing worth highlighting in the Euro scene is how the sport has developed a little in Brittany and especially Galicia. I don't think anyone cares about a group of lads of Junior D standard at best on the piss in Guernsey or Brussels. The lads based in Europe who are any good go home and play with their clubs...its only an hour or two away.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 385 - 07/03/2018 15:47:11    2082484

Link

Lads, the Euro scene is a shocking shocking standard of football played 11 a side on old rugby pitches with terrible referees. Don't kid yourselves. You'd be much better off integrating yourself into whatever country you find yourselves in and broaden your horizons.

Only thing worth highlighting in the Euro scene is how the sport has developed a little in Brittany and especially Galicia. I don't think anyone cares about a group of lads of Junior D standard at best on the piss in Guernsey or Brussels. The lads based in Europe who are any good go home and play with their clubs...its only an hour or two away.


Fair few assumptions in that cynical little posteen of yours.

Firstly, playing a bit of social GAA doesn't preclude you from integrating in your new country. For example, we have lads and ladies who've passed the bar exams in their second language, work through it in their jobs in education, finance, etc. Or Irish people who have locally-born kids and partners. A growing proportion (not just in Galicia or Brittany) are locals or non-Irish. It's not just students on the razz for an Erasmus semester or lads working in Irish pubs. I speak two European languages competently myself. Three hours of training per week and a few tournaments per year are hardly going to prevent you integrating with daily life in an EU country.

And as for fellas going home to play for their clubs, do me a favour. Few people are going to fly home from, say, Paris or Rome to somewhere like West Cork or Leitrim every other week to play club football due to the connectivity issues. If I want to go for a trip back to Mayo, I'd need to take an extra day off work (at the very least) to make it viable, and I live in a major European capital. It may be possible from the UK, but they have a far more regular flight schedule to Ireland, and to regional airports to boot.

The standard of play is much lower than back in Ireland, I don't think anyone disputes that. But it serves a purpose for people who want to play gaelic games, and I don't see any downside to that. People in Ireland don't really care about what goes on in Europe, but I don't really see why that should come into it, it's not as if we get anything from the GAA in Ireland anyway, or that we should be bound by what people think back there.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1494 - 08/03/2018 09:37:22    2082624

Link

What a weekend for French football. Provence, continuing to build on solid foundations, showed real class and composure to comfortably win their home tournament, beating favourites Bordeaux on a scoreline of 2-9 to 2-5. Unbeaten on the day, this young and energetic club, bolstered by a strong contingent of talented Irish students, were on a different level in their fortress at La Fare-Les-Oliviers. Blending both Irish and French players in their lineup, they were simply head and shoulders above the competition, proving that this team is more than a one trick pony leaning on the crutch of Erasmus students. They are shaping up to be serious competitors for the Division 1 title in June, with quality players in all positions and the squad depth to go the distance. In particular, their ability to score from seemingly outrageous distances and play keep-ball when necessary sets them apart, notwithstanding a second-half surge from Bordeaux in the final. It's a breath of fresh air to see a new team emerging that can challenge the triumvirate of Paris, Clermont and Bordeaux, after Toulouse's brief rise to the top 2 years ago. If they can continue to integrate and develop local talent then they will be a force to be reckoned with for years to come.

DessieDolan64 (Westmeath) - Posts: 1 - 18/03/2018 12:15:51    2085255

Link

Replying To DessieDolan64:  "What a weekend for French football. Provence, continuing to build on solid foundations, showed real class and composure to comfortably win their home tournament, beating favourites Bordeaux on a scoreline of 2-9 to 2-5. Unbeaten on the day, this young and energetic club, bolstered by a strong contingent of talented Irish students, were on a different level in their fortress at La Fare-Les-Oliviers. Blending both Irish and French players in their lineup, they were simply head and shoulders above the competition, proving that this team is more than a one trick pony leaning on the crutch of Erasmus students. They are shaping up to be serious competitors for the Division 1 title in June, with quality players in all positions and the squad depth to go the distance. In particular, their ability to score from seemingly outrageous distances and play keep-ball when necessary sets them apart, notwithstanding a second-half surge from Bordeaux in the final. It's a breath of fresh air to see a new team emerging that can challenge the triumvirate of Paris, Clermont and Bordeaux, after Toulouse's brief rise to the top 2 years ago. If they can continue to integrate and develop local talent then they will be a force to be reckoned with for years to come."
Wasn't at the tournament myself, but have to say I'm delighted to hear that, as you said it's a breath of fresh air. I know Bordeaux are a top class side first hand, so to beat them twice in that manner speaks volumes. I hear they have a few Spanish women supporting them too, any truth in that? They could be worth following at that rate!

ImpossibleAngle (Galway) - Posts: 5 - 20/03/2018 13:11:30    2086222

Link

Replying To DessieDolan64:  "What a weekend for French football. Provence, continuing to build on solid foundations, showed real class and composure to comfortably win their home tournament, beating favourites Bordeaux on a scoreline of 2-9 to 2-5. Unbeaten on the day, this young and energetic club, bolstered by a strong contingent of talented Irish students, were on a different level in their fortress at La Fare-Les-Oliviers. Blending both Irish and French players in their lineup, they were simply head and shoulders above the competition, proving that this team is more than a one trick pony leaning on the crutch of Erasmus students. They are shaping up to be serious competitors for the Division 1 title in June, with quality players in all positions and the squad depth to go the distance. In particular, their ability to score from seemingly outrageous distances and play keep-ball when necessary sets them apart, notwithstanding a second-half surge from Bordeaux in the final. It's a breath of fresh air to see a new team emerging that can challenge the triumvirate of Paris, Clermont and Bordeaux, after Toulouse's brief rise to the top 2 years ago. If they can continue to integrate and develop local talent then they will be a force to be reckoned with for years to come."
Two great tournaments over the last two weekends, one in Clermont and another last weekend in Provence. I'd have to disagree strongly with @gerloughane's post a couple of weeks ago saying the competition is weak as this looks to be the strongest and most competitive French championship in recent years, with a whole host of contenders for the main prize. Paris, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Provence and Clermont all showing strongly again trying earnestly to hold down a spot at the top table. While one might have expected the extremely well-resourced Paris Gaels to have their two teams again competing against each other in the final, it turned out that Toulouse managed to pull off a shock win against Paris Blue in the group stage. I suppose that's the kind of reward they deserved as they were the only team in that particular match interested in playing any football. However Toulouse went on to lose their semi final against Clermont who brought their usual gusto and unique brand of physicality to proceedings. Clermont would face off against Paris White in the final, where the capital-based team's antics finally caught up with them as they found themselves a man down early on. Though they tried as hard as they could, Clermont ultimately couldn't break down the Paris defence and eventually succumbed to a 2 point defeat. Paris escaped by the skin of their teeth, bruised but not broken.

The tournament in Provence turned out to be one where normal order and the traditional form book were thrown out the window. Provence laid down a marker against the bookies favourites Bordeaux in the pool stage, beating them by 5 points and left them feeling like had drunk a bit too much of the wine they are so famous for. The two heavyweights went on to waltz through the defences of the Azur Gaels, Niort and Bordeaux B as they cast the minnows further into the mire of Division Two football and relative obscurity. It came as no surprise that Bordeaux and Provence found themselves going toe to toe again in the tournament final. What followed in the first half can only be described as the closest thing to footballing perfection I have seen on French soil in quite a while, almost comparable to the playing style of Paris Gaels renowned 2014 side. They went in at the break with a 12 point advantage, having kicked points from every angle imaginable and adding a goal to boot. The fiery Bordeaux emerged a different animal in the second half however, taking full advantage of some lenient refereeing which bordered on outrageous at times to bring themselves back to within a point with just minutes left. With the game in the melting pot and neither side yielding an inch, the game got the spectacular finish it deserved when one of Provence's Irish contingent burst through a slew of challenges to loop the ball over the flailing Bordeaux keeper and seal the game for the Mediterranean side.

There's no questioning who is competing now and a clear picture is there for all to see on who might take home the spoils come June. Paris A remain the favourites, but the chasing pack smell blood and everyone now wants a piece.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 20/03/2018 15:15:08    2086272

Link

Replying To ImpossibleAngle:  "Wasn't at the tournament myself, but have to say I'm delighted to hear that, as you said it's a breath of fresh air. I know Bordeaux are a top class side first hand, so to beat them twice in that manner speaks volumes. I hear they have a few Spanish women supporting them too, any truth in that? They could be worth following at that rate!"
Some Italians involved too, from what I gather.

Heard a great story that one of the lads involved with Provence did a few training sessions with the inmates of a local prison! All games were played at home, of course.

French championship looks perfectly set up now.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1494 - 20/03/2018 17:19:41    2086330

Link

Replying To CyrilDonnellan8:  "Two great tournaments over the last two weekends, one in Clermont and another last weekend in Provence. I'd have to disagree strongly with @gerloughane's post a couple of weeks ago saying the competition is weak as this looks to be the strongest and most competitive French championship in recent years, with a whole host of contenders for the main prize. Paris, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Provence and Clermont all showing strongly again trying earnestly to hold down a spot at the top table. While one might have expected the extremely well-resourced Paris Gaels to have their two teams again competing against each other in the final, it turned out that Toulouse managed to pull off a shock win against Paris Blue in the group stage. I suppose that's the kind of reward they deserved as they were the only team in that particular match interested in playing any football. However Toulouse went on to lose their semi final against Clermont who brought their usual gusto and unique brand of physicality to proceedings. Clermont would face off against Paris White in the final, where the capital-based team's antics finally caught up with them as they found themselves a man down early on. Though they tried as hard as they could, Clermont ultimately couldn't break down the Paris defence and eventually succumbed to a 2 point defeat. Paris escaped by the skin of their teeth, bruised but not broken.

The tournament in Provence turned out to be one where normal order and the traditional form book were thrown out the window. Provence laid down a marker against the bookies favourites Bordeaux in the pool stage, beating them by 5 points and left them feeling like had drunk a bit too much of the wine they are so famous for. The two heavyweights went on to waltz through the defences of the Azur Gaels, Niort and Bordeaux B as they cast the minnows further into the mire of Division Two football and relative obscurity. It came as no surprise that Bordeaux and Provence found themselves going toe to toe again in the tournament final. What followed in the first half can only be described as the closest thing to footballing perfection I have seen on French soil in quite a while, almost comparable to the playing style of Paris Gaels renowned 2014 side. They went in at the break with a 12 point advantage, having kicked points from every angle imaginable and adding a goal to boot. The fiery Bordeaux emerged a different animal in the second half however, taking full advantage of some lenient refereeing which bordered on outrageous at times to bring themselves back to within a point with just minutes left. With the game in the melting pot and neither side yielding an inch, the game got the spectacular finish it deserved when one of Provence's Irish contingent burst through a slew of challenges to loop the ball over the flailing Bordeaux keeper and seal the game for the Mediterranean side.

There's no questioning who is competing now and a clear picture is there for all to see on who might take home the spoils come June. Paris A remain the favourites, but the chasing pack smell blood and everyone now wants a piece."
Some great football going on in the last few weeks. I was in Clermont 2 weeks ago but didn't catch Provenvce last week. Bordeaux A are undoubtedly a force to be reckoned with. I'm yet to see the Provence boys in action in 2018 but to beat Bordeaux twice shows their no pushovers. It's no secret to the French Football Community at this stage that they've a large contingency of Irish Students over this year, but be it Irish blood or not, doesn't necesserally mean they'll be burning it up like they are at the moment. From what I've heard, they're tearing defences apart, playing a lovely brand of ball. They fell at the hands of Paris last month but that could've been due to inexperience of youth more than anything else. However, being students and all, question arises whether they'll be on 'Hexagon Turf' come June? They could could be pissing into the wind laying down a spot in Division 1 thorughout these ranking tournamnets.
Great Confidence boost for Toulouse in Clermont getting the better of Paris Blue in the pool stage showing the rest of France that resources aren't everything when push comes to shove. However, possible they burnt out in penultimate match against the Capital Lillywhites. When the homeside went toe-toe against the Whites in the final, their phsicality wasn't enough. The game was in the balance in the closing moments but Cometh the Hour, Cometh the man, Brannigan took the game by the scruff of the kneck, like he's done so many for the Gaels throughout the years.
I think it's fair to say that the overall standard of football in France has reached new levels this year, great to see. More ranking tournaments to come next month in Niort and Toulouse, looking forward to it!

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 23/03/2018 16:07:15    2087280

Link

Well the weekend has finally arrived for the first 'Major Tournament' of the French championship after 4 interesting minor championships. Points for each placed finish will be worth double what they normally are this time round so there's an extra incentive for each of the 'Big Six' (Paris A&B, Bordeaux, Provence, Clermont and Toulouse) to show what they're capable of.

Split into four groups of three, Paris White and Bordeaux A will be expected to breeze their respective groups with plenty to spare for the semi-finals. Paris Blue's only realistic challenger in Group D will be a Toulouse Gaels side that are weaker than we have seen in recent years, relying a bit too much on veteran Kiwi Mike Lawson to carry them through matches as he has done time and time again in the past. Paris Blue will still be expected to progress but there's the possibility of an upset.

The best game of the group stage undoubtedly lies within pool C when the two titans Clermont and Provence Bulls will go toe to toe again in what promises to be an epic contest. There is no love lost between these two fiery teams with each team having registered a win apiece in the matches between them thus far. The result of this clash will go a long way towards deciding which of the 2 sides makes it to the division 1 finals in June so the importance of this clash cannot be understated. Clermont's dynamic midfield will be a massive factor in this tie and the Bulls will be looking to shut them down at every opportunity. Provence are said to be missing a few keys players for this tournament but their immense scoring power has taken them to a position they haven't previously experienced so they clearly won't be fearful of anyone.

The loser of that clash will most likely win the tournament shield, where Toulouse or possibly Lyon will likely be their best competition.

My pre-tournament favourites have to be Paris White, who remain as imperious as the Dubs back home. Bordeaux will be reeling from their final loss to Provence and much like Mayo their mental frailty could cost them again here. I expect Provence to narrowly defeat Clermont which would allow them to claim a Cup semifinal berth for the first time, they're an unpredictable bunch so it's hard to say how far they could go. Paris Blue will also be looking to stake a claim at the very top table after loitering around it in recent years. On their day they can take down the very best.
It looks to be the tightest french championship in recent memory. Overall a great weekend of football ahead in Niort under clear blue skies.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 20/04/2018 18:54:44    2094139

Link

How's it looking ahead of this weekend's fourth championship round in Toulouse?

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1494 - 18/05/2018 09:25:50    2101884

Link

Replying To Gleebo:  "How's it looking ahead of this weekend's fourth championship round in Toulouse?"
Well it's that time of the year folks where we're really getting into the business end of the french championship with Toulouse hosting the second and last tournament 'majeur' before the national finals in June. After impressively winning the last tournament, Paris White will have to be the favourites once more despite the fact that they were given a few nervy tests on their last outing. They have already qualified for the finals which means there will be intense battling between Bordeaux, Provence, Clermont and Toulouse to claim the last two berths for a shot at the ultimate prize.
Bordeaux's mental frailty reared it's head once more last tournament as they crashed out in the semis and you'd wonder if they still have the legs to operate on the same level as they have done in previous years. Their only way forward will be to front up and rise up for the cause.
Despite going unbeaten last tournament, Provence didn't qualify for the semis because of inferior points difference in the group stage. They will be making the journey west with a vengeance, and their forward fire power will be something to be wary of, as Paris Blue became all too familiar with in the 5th placed playoff last day out when they were ripped to shreds. They won't be interested in settling for division 2 football this year.
Clermont had seemed to leave behind the pitchforks, knives and whatever other farmer's tricks they usually bring to the table until the tournament final in Niort, when they spectacularly fell apart in the second half. Even Rachel Riley would have lost count of the number of cards dished out in their direction. Will they be capable of keeping their cynical side in check this time round and qualify for the first ever division one appearance?
The former powerhouse Toulouse had to combine with Azur Gaels last time out to field but nevertheless only finished fourth despite the help. They are as unpredictable as ever, looking to run riot at one moment and looking hapless the next. The return of kiwi Mike Lawson from injury will be a timely boost to the side. They'll be looking to him for inspiration roving around the middle of the park, dictating games with his brain and applying the killer touch with his sweet left boot. They won't want to miss the party come June.
It's as hotly contested a french championship as one can remember and surely promises to be a blockbuster weekend.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 18/05/2018 17:54:30    2102010

Link

Paris White made it a clean sweep, I gather?

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1494 - 21/05/2018 16:18:33    2102719

Link

Replying To Gleebo:  "Paris White made it a clean sweep, I gather?"
Paris did indeed complete the sweep of all tournaments they have been involved in. However if the matches at last weekend's tournament are anything to go by, they'll still have a fight on their hands to retain the french title in June. At the end of the federal championship, Paris have won 2 major and 2 minor tournaments, while Bordeaux and Provence have won a minor tournament apiece. Paris White and Provence emerged from group A as predicted with minimal fuss, dishing out a few drubbings along the way. Group B was always going to be the one to watch though as it contained three teams still holding aspirations of division one football, so there was widespread shock when Toulouse were dumped out on their home turf before the semi finals were even played. Former winners of the national championship, they had been hyped up all year as holding their free-flowing football in reserve for a late burst around now. Alas that burst never came and they lost out to Bordeaux and Clermont. Despite a full complement of players, their leader Lawson couldn't provide the necessary spark to pull them through.
Paris White played Clermont in the first semi final in what was an extremely tense and controversial affair. At key moments in the game the capital side were handed the initiative as some very lenient refereeing during their defensive efforts allowed them to force key turnovers and break at speed. By the second half Clermont were seething, lashing out at any given opportunity and losing sight of their game. Their playmaker Touquet had to come deeper and deeper to influence the game where he is less effective and ultimately this massively cost them. Paris won with a couple to spare but not before Clermont had made their feelings known.
In the other showdown Provence faced Bordeaux in what was once again a very aggressive game, with flashes of quality on display every now and then. Similar to their last meeting, Provence started extremely well with excellent point-taking from their forwards and adding 2 goals to boot. They went in at the break with a 5 point lead. The second half was unrecognizable compared to the first. Provence were so keen to prevent any goals being conceded that they fouled anything that moved. Certain full backs hounded their markers like lions chasing a gazelle. Scuffles were breaking out every two minutes but remarkably no red cards were handed out. Despite converting several frees, Bordeaux eventually came up short by 2 and Provence reached their first ever major final.
Having secured a Division One spot for the Lyon finals after winning the semi-final, one might have expected 'The Bulls' Provence to take the foot off the gas in the final against Paris. However when a bull is provoked it will only come charging out more fiercely than before. Patient build-up and stout defending were the characteristic of the first half with both team quite cagey throughout proceedings. Paris looked to be going into half time with a three point lead before Provence sucker punched them with a goal deep into injury time to level up matters. After trading a couple of points after half time, Paris flexed their muscles (and their wallets) by opening up a decent lead through a number of soft frees. With time against them Provence went in search of a goal but the benefits of Paris's coaching sessions with Na Fianna were clear to see as Provence struggled to break down their rigid defense. As the final whistle approached Provence laid siege to the Paris goalmouth in search of an ever elusive goal. However in the dying embers of the match, a crossfield ball was lofted into the Paris square which was fisted into the net by Provence's warhorse captain to leave two between the sides. However it was too little, too late for the Marseille-based side as they succumbed to their third defeat of the season against Paris.
This all means that it is Paris, Bordeaux and Provence who have qualified for the division one finals in June, with Clermont losing out the most from this tournament as they have to settle for place in the division two finals. It's 4 tournament wins out 4 for Paris, but the gap is narrowing with every match as teams are beginning to see they are not infallible. I'd predict plenty of surprises come June 16th in what has certainly been the best French championship in recent times.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 07/06/2018 14:07:14    2108385

Link